Hey!
Have you ever played tabletop RPGs? Like Dungeon & Dragons. Like the ones that they show in TV shows, where players dress up in weird costumes and talk in accents?
Tell me your favorite memory/campaign/session if you have played these types of games!
Bonus question to avid players: I got Rime of the Frostmaiden and The Wild beyond Witchlight for my birthday. As a forever DM, which one should I run first?

3 months ago

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Bump!

3 months ago
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Have you ever played tabletop RPGs? Like Dungeon & Dragons. Like the ones that they show in TV shows, where players dress up in weird costumes and talk in accents?

I haven't exactly played with it.
(Unless you count being mistaken for such a character and playing an MMO...)

I've seen some videos on Nico Nico Douga and other sites that have gone to the trouble of making videos based on the records of playing those TRPGs.
📝1
📝2
It seems to be a case of introducing a good story to others.

Rime of the Frostmaiden

I think there are more videos on the subject here, so I recommend that one.

3 months ago
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Well, from my almost 20 year experience I can tell that I've yet to see a real tabletop campaign where people would dress up in weird costumes and talk in accents. :)

As for the two adventures you've mentioned, I'm unfamiliar with The Wild beyond Witchlight, but since it's in Feywild then it's not my cup of tea anyway (fairies, bleh). On the other hand, Rime of the Frostmaiden is something I'm considering DM'ing myself once we finish Curse of Strahd which my girlfriend is running (or once it finishes us because it seems really cursed and we're playing it for 2.5 years already and not even halfway into it, as everytime we're trying to get together one of the players gets covid or breaks a leg or gets a new job in Kenya or something else happens :/ )

3 months ago
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Ok, now what's your favorite part of CoS? I'm playing it myself, but I believe we should be in about half. Party is level 8, I think. We have been at it for 1,5years.
My favorite memory. Party decided to not help Lady Vachter overthrow the Vallaki mayor. So we left. After a while we came back, finding mayor and his wife executed in town square. For Ireena reasons we went through the mayor's house. My cleric found a mirror. After looking into it, DM privately messaged me saying that my Cleric is charmed and will see Strahd as his friend. Tfw Strahd asks me to bring all the party to a certain location. Tfw I know it's a setup, but my character can't say shit, as he believes it's legit meeting. Tfw everyone gets ambushed by like 8 vampires

3 months ago
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Thanks for spoiler tag. Not reading it just in case it's about something we haven't done yet. Since your party is lvl 8 that means you're quite far ahead of ours, we're only lvl 5 atm (probably getting lvl 6 at next session when it happens). As for my favorite moments... well, aside from my half-orc bard eating some tasty pies with a "secret ingredient" and having a nice trip and crit-kicking a stray zombie hand that tried to grab him american football-style, we have a druid dwarf in our party who's drinking every liquid in game and mixing it in his flask, so he drank poisoned wine at the Wizard of Wines, failed all possible checks and literally went down to 1 hp while we had no healing left. That was kind of scary and fun at the same time. :)

3 months ago
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I tried to play such games a couple of times, but to be honest, I didn't really understand the rules and I wasn't interested.
However, I have a few friends who genuinely love it.

3 months ago
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I can understand how you feel. Rules might be overwhelming. Players handbook for dungeons and dragons 5th edition is like 300pages. And it is understandable that nobody wants to read that to play a game. Especially if there is a Skyrim option, which requires watching one cringy-funny cutscene.
I would just like to encourage you to find some group that can help you with creating character, and not drown you in rules.

3 months ago
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Maybe it would be nice, but I have too little time to do this seriously. Sorry (

3 months ago
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I started Pen & Paper Rollplaying in 2011 with a scifi fantasy setting called "Shadowrun" (4th Edition). We tested different other rulebooks and settings like "Star Wars - Edge of the Empire", DSA (The Dark Eye - Similar to DnD), Deadlands (Horror western setting) but mostly we kept playing Shadowrun were I wrote or played around 50 adventures till 2016. Lately I have a group to play DSA every two or three months.

We never did it in costumes but we played the roles acording to the personality of our characters (For example an Orc with low intelligence spoke in very simple words). Also I provided several images, maps and music to create more immersion.

There are so much memories from that time ... so much adventures we usually talk about ... a friend of mine used to add recuring strange elements to the story like the same two elves have been spotted in every second adventure ... we never got to know if they were bounty hunters or ghosts ... and what their mission was or why we crossed paths with them so often ... it was a simple but very mysterious little story element. He never told us who they were and they used to disappear around a corner every time we tried to approach them.

I guess I would go for "The Wild beyond Witchlight" ... that setting looks really nice.

View attached image.
3 months ago*
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Hey! Thank you for sharing.
The odd elves sure sounds like an interesting trick.

3 months ago
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One of the memorable moments I saw in my few games as a player was when I saw a genuinely smart player play a low-intelligence warrior.

We were looking for some monks from a Golden Horn sect, which was operating in the city in complete secrecy. And while we were stuck in a dead end, debating how to proceed, the warrior simply went to the first tavern he saw, kicked in the door, smote the floor with the end of his halberd, and bellowed across the stunned common room: "We're looking for Golden Horn monks here! Anyone seen them? No? Well, thanks." By the time he did that in the third tavern, the monks sent some assassins to silence us, so as not to alert the whole city to their presence... and we got the meeting we wanted. :-)

3 months ago
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Awesome Story!
I love the struggle when a strategist player plays a low inteligence character. For example when the whole party has to solve a puzzle or a tricky situation and that player has the solution but he can't really share it with the crew because his character actually couldn't solve the situation. =D

3 months ago
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bump!

3 months ago
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Bump!

3 months ago
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Played a lot of pen & paper RPGs in the 90s. Shadowrun, Vampire the Masquerade, Runequest, MERP, AD & D and a few others. Best experience was to play MERP the first time not as a DM and with a bunch of people I barely knew. The DM was great and really acted out all the NPCs. It was a fairly simple scenario, but all the players brought their characters to life. And no, noone dressed up in weird costumes though there was talking in accents ;)

3 months ago
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I am also one of the Shadowrun people, starting with 3 and mostly staying there, as Shadowrun 4 never quite hit the same spot (which is probably more for the sentimental value as my first pen&paper experience than for the differences in the rules. Soon I got to be the permanent DM for two groups and also got to play some DSA ("german" Dungeon&Dragons aka The Dark Eye), Cthulhu, Vampires the Masquerade and "Plüsch, Power & Plunder" where you played as stuffed animals :D
Fun times.
We had a list for the best quotes made during the games, but somehow it got lost after a few years without playing. The most fond memories are probably the ones when it finally clicked between players and DM and the riddle got solved or there was a great idea how to go on with the storyline when the campain got terribly derailed.

3 months ago
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Wäre "Die Schwarze Katze" vielleicht einen Blick wert? Ich meine da Du DSA und "Plüsch, Power & Plunder" gespielt hast.
DSK bei Ullisses bzw. in der Wiki Aventurica

3 months ago
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Ohhh, in der Tat! Bin leider die letzten Jahre ziemlich rausgewesen, aber dafür hätte ich vermutlich sogar noch motivierbare Leute irgendwo :D Danke für den Tip!

3 months ago
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Gern geschehen. :-)
Falls Du erstmal einen Überblick über die bisher erschienen Publikationen bekommen möchtest, hier sind sie in ihrer billigeren PDF Form: https://www.ulisses-ebooks.de/browse.php?filters=45793_0&src=fid45793

Schönes Wochenende!

3 months ago
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last off, I ran ICE's RMSS Shadow World, with no irl frilly stuff, in a licensed catered gaming club, dusk to dawn, for 5 years with 9-12 players, including females sheilas

3 months ago*
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"including females" sounds a bit... weird? i know you just wanna emphasize the fact the group was mixed but just say women and men or something? i apologize if it was meant as a joke (hard to tell via text)

3 months ago
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🙄🔇

3 months ago
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no, but I was always jelous of those that have a close friend group who's up to stuff like that. I don't even know if I'd like it for sure, but sounds fun to me.

3 months ago
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I have a group with my cousins, although the group is too big (9 players), which makes it very unstable (as a DM, this is my personal hell :^) ). Still, since we have the confidence to joke among us because we know each other for too long, we do the voices of the characters, makes it funnier (the sillier the voice, the more enjoyment we get). Having said that, we dont do the cosplay thing, I think that would be a bit too much for all of us.

3 months ago
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I play Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay (Edition 4) for longer time already. But it is not exactly full experience as we play by discord. But I was always interested in such RPG but never had chance to play it. Now I have and it is cool even by discord:).

3 months ago
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Tell me something fun from the game. What kind of character are you playing? What great adventures has he accomplished?
I have recently been watching wh40k videos. The setting seems amazing and there are too many games for the setting. How does the roleplay go, how is the system different from others?

3 months ago
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Yea. But Warhammer Fantasy RPG and Warhammer 4K are 2 different systems in different setting (like past vs future) :).

My English is not good enough to freely with easy describe everything but I will write very simplified story of my character (as it was even something like a short story like in books:
From "official" profession point of view I play Pit Fighter who start pursue adventure. I am very driven by traumatic past and personal reasons. I come from a respected family. The parents owned an estate near Ubersreik and serve empire. As A child was prepared for something else, but then from complex and still not fully revealed reasons mansion was attacked and probably everyone was killed in attack (although bodies of my family members was not find as far I know). I am still alive by miracle and at first lost most of the memory (also was still a child). I woke up outside building with only strange amulet in my hand and huge headache. Then I somehow was able to reach Ubersreik and just I was begging on the street to survive. It was a hard life and my willpower was slowly dying. So when someone was looking for people to do brutal, illegal fights, I agreed. I don't know if it's more for a bowl of food or to end this suffering. My mental state was already so weak that it was a kind of suicide. I just had a dead wish. But somehow i won one fights, second and following. My memory started to return more and more also i was more and more driven by a willingness to discover what happened and to take revenge on those who did it to me years ago. Later I, and some of persons I meet was offered a work for a head of the boatbuilders' guild which also had some different passions (not connected directly with a guild related to knowledge, historical things etc). He offered as a fixed remuneration in the form of covering the costs of food and place to sleep and additional remuneration for acquired items / knowledge / tasks performed. It was start of our adventures and the opportunity to stand on my feet and collect resources that would also enable the achievement of my goals. And I was able to find already more and more information and clues and I have a theory, but still a lot ahead of me. Of course If I will survive :). World is harsh and full of dangers and my work is not safe too:).

BTW: my story has also impact on character and even some starting skills/talents (fits well).

3 months ago
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I'm playing "Das Schwarze Auge" (The Dark Eye in the english version) since 1992, both as a player and GM. The core group is still the same, though nowadays we only play 3-4 times a year in person... due to RL. I own most material for DSA there is from 2nd edition to the 5th edition, that's the most recent one.
I also played some Vampire the Masquerade, but that was ages ago.

Not once was anyone wearing costumes, but we did and do play out our characters.

3 months ago
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We were kids and didn't had money to buy official campaigns so our DMs were creating their owns campaigns. We got our hands on Player Handbook and also searched some info in the internet about D&D.

I loved Fighters and Dwarfs so that was what I was playing. I still love Fighters and Rogues and Dwarfs and Half-Orcs the most :)

But this story is not about me :)

It is about 2 different groups of friends and how stupid and crazy wizards were back in the day!

ONE:

This party DM rule was that magic is powerful and real so it leaves an impact on everything so if you cast a fire spell something close can start to burn if you are not careful...

Party was in woods during autumn close to a keep protecting a small town hidden in the mountains. Captain of the keep gave us a mission to kill the goblins in the woods as they were getting annoying. The keep was the only thing that stand between them and a small mining town and safe roads for trade were a priority so the town would not starve as it needed to buy food from traders and also sell their iron and everything that the blacksmith was able to craft from it.

We were getting ready for a night rest after doing some investigation in the woods. We had a nice campfire and food ready then suddenly the goblins tried to ambush us! Us the mighty heroes! Well the starting heroes! Well the beginning adventurers! But we didn't start at level 1 we were level 3 if I remember correctly.

Well the ambush was not a big surprise as we spotted them before they could surround us so our quick thinking Wizard rolled great initiative and already had a great plan as all the goblins were in one area at that time. He screams: FIREBALL!!!

Long story short the entire forest was on fire and the guards hiding in the keep were pointing fingers at us and laughing while we were running down the road chased by all the wolves, bears, goblins and a few trolls escaping the burning forest. Also the closed keep gate was a small symbol we are no longer welcome there :)

TWO:

Party number 2 where DM rule was that party should communicate on what they want to do and how they approach a problem and when they make a decision they tell GM exactly what they do or give him a piece of paper with who takes what actions if it is more complex plan or if they can't decide each player can just give him a piece of paper with information what he will do. If it is not a complex plan that means all actions happen at the same time.

Well the party was in a dungeon and we found a stone door without any handle and with many pictures of flames and fire on them and some runes and dark red gem in the middle.

We also had 2 wizards in the party! What can go wrong when you have 2 wizards and they want to show everyone which one is the better more intelligent one?! Nothing can go wrong right? Right?

The first wizard screams he is going to open that doors while the 2nd wizard screams he will be the one to open these doors! They started to shout at each other who is the best as a good roleplay ;) The rest of the party was just laughing at two mad wizards. Suddenly they both gave a note to GM.

The fallout:

Wizard number 1 runs close to the door to read the runes.
Wizard number 2 screams FIREBALL and cast it at the door.
Wizard number 1 flies back to the party thanks to the shock wave of fireball exploding on the door but one of his hands fly faster than the rest of him.
Wizard 1 is still alive and the party panics as the dark red gem on the door starts to light up and become more bright with time.
Cleric starts to cast healing spells, I hold the wizard arm in a place where it should be connected to the rest of him and the rogue put our only regeneration potion that we looted in the dungeon into the wizard mouth and screams at him to drink it till the last drop.
While the arm starts to join the rest of the wizard and regenerate in a matter of seconds the doors gem glows brightly red and the doors open.
Wizard number 1 screams: Taaaadaaaaaa!
Wizard number 2 screams: You ruined my robe you &%^$^^$%!

From now one firedoor were a running joke in the group.

3 months ago*
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Great stories :)
I liked especially how detailed the 1st one was, and how much sense it makes in the world. Sounds like a great DM.

3 months ago
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Both were great :)

The 2nd world and using notes and planing was best when we needed do things like investigate a noble mansion and steal evidences that he is evil.

Like there is no sense for a fighter, cleric, rogue and 2 wizards to enter the same way by climbing wines near a window as only the rogue would be stealthy enough to move unseen and good enough to disarm traps while wizards would probably fail their climbing and athletics checks and wake the whole mansion up by falling from the wines and fighter and cleric would wake everyone up because of our metal armors.

So waiting for a party as nobles love to party and mingle was the best option.

Wizards entering as the honor guests to entertain nobles with magic tricks made the more sense and of course they were the only ones that openly show they know and hate each other and that also made nobles love them more as one was all about showing fire tricks and the other one about lightning tricks.

Me Fighter Dwarf entered as the body guard of the good noble that was our quest giver.

Cleric entered as honor guest from his temple to spread the world of his god.

So some nobles were entertain by one wizard some by the other some by both of them laughing at their remarks toward each other and some by wise and charismatic cleric words and some by our noble quest giver. And body guards of nobles by my tales and arm wrestling competition.

At the same time our rogue menage to enter the second floor, disarm all the traps, open all the locks, knock out but not kill a few guards and steal all the evidence we needed and also some gold and jewelry.

Mission was success without anyone really fighting, anyone dying and the knocked guards on the upper floor were discovered much later after the party ended. And at that point thanks to everything we found the city watch did surround the noble estate and the guards of the noble surrendered without a fight after showing them the evidence of what the noble was doing.

After that all we had to do was to kill 2 guards that did know about everything and the noble that was hiding that he is an evil necromancer and some undeads when the noble was trying to run away with his 2 trusted guards into his underground secret passage that was leading to a crypt on cemetery that was just outside the city walls.

3 months ago
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Have you ever played tabletop RPGs? Like Dungeon & Dragons. Like the ones that they show in TV shows, where players dress up in weird costumes and talk in accents?

I have. I have played Pathfinder, Mutants and Masterminds, Dungeons & Dragons 3e & 5e; as well as Mutants & Masterminds.

Tell me your favorite memory/campaign/session if you have played these types of games!

Probably when I played an Alchemist class in Pathfinder. I went out of my way to find and spend most of my money on random alchemy items that did unique things. Bubblegum 60 Ft Rope, Instant Cement, Defoliant {Plant Killer}, and many others. I still remember the DM at one point calling me a Metal Man Batman Ripoff; for which I took it as a challenge and went unarmed from level 3 to 20 except for what I could pull from my pack and toolbelt. I also leveled up certain traits of my alchemist in order to gain more arms so I could throw more objects. :P

Bonus question to avid players: I got Rime of the Frostmaiden and The Wild beyond Witchlight for my birthday. As a forever DM, which one should I run first?

I would say it depends on your playerbase. Ask them if they want more of a survival aspect or more of an adventure mystery. Some players don't like playing survival based campaigns.

3 months ago
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I played a lot during my teenage years, like every week or so, before the group scattered all around the world (literally). Since then I've played a few games with (other) friends now and then but nothing as regular. I started playing around 10 with The Dark Eye (German game which was already mentioned a few times in the thread), tried a few popular things like Warhammer, D&D or Vampire, some less popular, but quickly settled on a custom system - no need to buy tons of rulebooks when you have a bit of imagination :)

3 months ago
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It seems like The Dark Eye was really popular in Germany. How is it different from DnD? What is the setting like?

3 months ago
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It went through quite a few versions since I played it, but the first edition was not much different tbh. Classes, base stats, levels, and lots of D20 rolls. All that feels very similar to D&D (although more streamlined than the mess that was 2E). Only magic felt different as it used a mana pool instead of spells per day (I never liked D&D's spell system). The setting was a pretty generic fantasy world, don't expect Dark Sun or Planescape here :x

3 months ago
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Here is a video in English about how The Dark Eye came to be: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3dw7jpZSRs
It explaines why there are similarities and differences between DnD and TDE. Though today TDE has IMHO drifted quite far away from DnD.
Here are a few links:

Depending on which continent you play on the setting differs quite a bit.

3 months ago
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If you want to get a taste of The Dark Eye

I STRONGLY recommend to play:

Drakensang
Drakensang: The River of Time

I will have to play these games again on Steam to do a reviews in the future :)

3 months ago
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Never, unfortunately :\

3 months ago
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Deleted

This comment was deleted 3 months ago.

3 months ago
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Never and I don't know anybody who played it. So I wonder if it could be more popular in some country or not...

3 months ago
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I've played D&D video games since the late 90's (Baldur's Gate and Neverwinter Nights) but never actually had a chance to play the tabletop version until a few years ago. My friends and I decided to play through Curse of Strahd as our first taste and it was absolutely fantastic, I think all of us immediately fell in love with D&D.
Since then I've become known as "that guy" in our group because I always find ways to "break" the campaigns we play by finding unconventional ways around things (such as skipping a puzzle and avoiding a really tough fight in the Curse of Strahd prologue by using the spell Mold Earth to create a staircase out of loose dirt).

I've also been really interested in the Star Wars RPG, Delta Green, Alien RPG, MOTHERSHIP and a few other TTRPGS but I haven't had a chance to properly play any of them yet.

In regards to your question though, I'd go for The Wild beyond the Witchlight as I've heard it's a more whimsical type of adventure and there are lots of ways to progress through the adventure without fighting, if your players are smart enough.

3 months ago
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I have played for a long period from my youth until finishing my PhD ... from dnd to gurps.... and in the end gettting stuck with dnd 3.5 for over 15 years (never migrated to 4, since it was not to our taste cough it was crap cough)
we never went as far as changing voices... but just the regular change in behaviour to fit character background. /class and the story.

Sadly I cannot recommend you any of the two adventures... we were mostly set in homemade territory around Tormenta world setting

3 months ago
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What did you get PhD in. And why you are no longer playing?
Tell me about Tormenta

3 months ago
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I played with the same group from my bachelor until my PhD (in sciences. To be more precise, focus in physical-chemistry - molecular electronics)
The only bad part about this group in specific was the exclusive heroic thematic in pre-epic / epic levels...
Said that, since none of us wanted to DM, we would go along with the genre. haha

Tormenta is a scenario created in Brazil. Other than specific pantheons / landmarks, it is characterized by the presence of Tormentas (free translated as Storms). Sometimes caused by mundane actions, magic cataclysms or even just for the fact the plane existed... and not even the god's will could stop it. (hence the need of a group of fools / heroes wanna be, to try to fix it before everything is destroyed).

There is even a manga on this scenario: holy avenger

edit: fixing the clicky link

3 months ago
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Another forever-DM here. :-) In the homebrew campaign (and a whole homebrew system) we played, I tried to focus on information -- gathering it, deducing connections, resolving situations when different PCs had conflicting info about something... And also on details, and on believability and logic -- there may be elements of magic or supernatural, but generally, things need to make sense to the PCs, be it magic, politics, or simply how the world works. For instance, no-one is born an undefeatable, highly skilled hero. The PCs started as complete commoners, were only discovering their talents, and it wasn't until the third adventure of the campaign that the party killed anything in combat (not counting hunting for food), and that was in self-defense.

One of my favorite episodes was when the party was trying to find out who sent puppeteers (this world's highly illegal/feared necromancers) to skeleton-terrorize some villages along an established trade route. They managed to kill the puppeteer endangering one of the villages, and found out among his notes that in a few days, he was supposed to meet in secret with another puppeteer, who did not know him, in a crossroads inn further along the route. So the party decided that one of them, a smith/tinkerer, would take the dead puppeteer's hooded cloak, pose as him and go to the meeting to find out more from the other one.

The place was called The Black Noose Inn -- as a clear warning that despite being a lonely crossroads inn, the law still applies here, an actual hanged corpse swings from a gallows next to the gate at all times. The inn gets the corpses from neighboring villages whenever a criminal is executed, and since it's not that often, they keep them from rotting away by covering them in tar, which has blackened the noose over the years.

Now the party arrived a day too early, and to cover the cost of accommodation and to blend in, when the inn staff were recruiting helpers for some tasks, the party joined up. Some went to help in the bakery, some in the stables, and the tinkerer gladly signed up for “minor repairs”.

It turned out that “minor repairs” meant taking the slowly rotting corpse off the noose and applying a new layer of tar. After a couple NPCs who had originally volunteered for minor repairs chickened out (or rather stumbled away, vomiting), the tinkerer managed to finish on his own, and earned the respect of the inn staff.

In the evening, the other puppeteer -- a grizzled, cautious-looking, scowling loner -- finally arrived, and saw the tinkerer sitting alone at the agreed-upon table. He didn't pay much attention to the rest of the party sitting at a table nearby, secretly listening in, and he joined the tinkerer. After exchanging some improvised passwords (which was a hilarious bit of improvisation, but unfortunately not translatable into English), in order to establish that they both were the puppeteers sent to terrorize this trade route, they started talking. They were keeping quiet and very cautious, and both were making sure that neither of them would utter a single word which, if overheard, could identify them as puppeteers.

And then, in the middle of their dialogue, the barmaid who had been assigning the jobs earlier comes to the tinkerer with a tankard, and in a clear voice ringing across the whole common room, she says: “Here's one on the house for the only guy around here who can deal with corpses!”

Never in all my RPG experience was it so satisfying to act out a look of complete shock and disbelief, as the puppeteer thought that his partner carelessly told everyone who he is... because that look of shock was mirrored on the players' faces. :-) But somehow, they managed to get through it, and even quite successfully mask the fact that all four people at a nearby table suddenly choked on their beer. :-)

And after that, that kind of RPG magic that long-time DMs know and love, happened -- I saw how much the players enjoyed this puppeteer's character, and overnight, he got a completely different backstory. Got turned from a throwaway villain into a sad antihero, and later, ally. The moment I was most proud of the party was during one of the following sessions, when they got into a fight with the puppeteer and his minions, and they managed to stop the fight. And it was neither from the position of power, as a clear victor sparing the enemy, nor as begging for mercy, but as diplomacy at a moment when the fight could have gone either way. One moment, you have everyone fighting zombies and the party's fighter/fire-mage pinned to the cave floor by a reanimated corpse of an ancient cave bear, breathing fire and peeling off the remains of the mummified flesh to reveal the bear's snarling skull just inches away from his own face, the next moment, you have two sides sitting at a campfire and talking. And the whole setup it took was seeing a zombie gathering flowers, intercepting one pigeon message, and in the depths of the caves before the encounter, hearing the puppeteer sing a love song.

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That is an amazing story! Thanks for sharing :)

3 months ago
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Always was curious about D&D. Comes my birthday in September, my sister bought me the starter kit. I read the whole rulesbook in my spare time. A few weeks later, we gather together - me, her, and my other sister. I explain how it all works based on my meager knowledge from reading the starter kit's rulesbook.

After getting that out of the way, we try to figure out how to fill out character sheets. We partially get through it over a couple of hours, with a lot of confusion that even the rulesbook doesn't really help with. We decide to continue later.

Few weeks pass, me and my sister who gave me the game find another opportunity to see each other to give it another go. We go through the rulesbook again, do a bit of progress, then give up for the session since we're not really getting anywhere.

Few more weeks (month?) goes by before all three of us can see each other again for a session. I get serious - rulesbook, laptop, we're alone in a quiet room so we can have full focus on the game. Through looking up the internet, we finally get a better idea of how the character sheet should be filled out. We correct mistakes, and progress a bit further. Takes a lot of time and research though, and we soon need to end the session.

And here we are.

...It's been 5 months in total since I got the game. All we did so far is partially fill out our character sheets. Pandemic restrictions hit hard in the last month, plus just life in general getting in the way, so we haven't really had any opportunity to "play" again. But maaaaan I feel stupid we can't figure this shit out. The rulesbook seems really confusing how it's designed, but even so, I feel it really shouldn't take that much time to figure out the very first step of playing.

We'll try to have another go at some point. I can be pretty patient, especially with nerdy stuff. :P

3 months ago
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For newer players, the person running the game should really just make pre generated characters so you can have the experience of actually playing [or you describe the kind of character you want then they crunch out the mechanics for you in advance]

3 months ago*
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I totally agree with you. It feels like books are unnecessarily huge for first timers. It's easy to get into it if there is someone who is experienced to show you the ropes. And then you can rely on the books, if there is some very specific rule or situation that needs to be figured out.
But good luck, I hope you do end up liking it :)

3 months ago
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To get the first taste of tabletop role-playing, I heartily recommend some "one-shot" not using D&D, but some much, much simpler ruleset, or even none at all. A great, wacky and entertaining example is Crash Pandas -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9EP7jiVJnU -- led by Sam Riegel, the players/actors of Vox Machina play a bunch of raccoons who join illegal street racing. The rules fit on one or two A4 pages, the video is less than 3 hours long, but it shows you a complete adventure. Well worth watching. :-)

There are quite a few advantages of such one-shots:

  • They don't need to use (but may, if you want to) complicated rulesets. You may just go with "if whatever the players want to do makes for an interesting story that fits the theme, it goes", possibly just inventing dice rolls on the spot. You can play a Star Trek game with just a few numbers like Strength, Piloting, Science and Charm skills per character, and then go like: "I want to hack the Enterprise's universal translator so that different species stop understanding each other" "Uh, sure, roll a die and add your Science skill, you succeed on 8 or higher". The player rolls a 5, adds their Science of 3, Lt. Chekov and Mr. Spock get into an argument in Russian and some version of Vulcan, and the route to the transporter room is left unguarded. Success!
  • They are easier to play over video chat like Discord (been there, done that).
  • Since the characters are so simplified and only expected to be around for this one short adventure, all bets are off -- they can get severely maimed or even get killed off and completely replaced, if your detective or horror story needs it.
  • Lots of ideas and examples (like the Crash Pandas one above) are available for free download. Quick googling gets you e.g. https://1shotadventures.com/adventure-index/
  • You can get as wacky and silly as you like. In the adventure we played over video chat, the player party consisted of a glue maker, an accordion thief, a turtle tamer, a garden designer, a backpack guy, and a hotel reviewer. It only got sillier from there. :-)
3 months ago
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