So my nephew who just turned 12 is finally getting his own PC, in the past 5 years i used to let him play on mine at the weekends, usually fortnite ,apex legends and the other odd online game here and there. he used to play in my accounts. now that he got his PC he wants to transfer his progress and items in such games. so he asked me to "share" my gaming accounts. so that he can play at his home.
I'm a 30 years old man who don't play much anymore but still I play, and I'm feeling kinda torn apart, should i tell him to start over!!! he'll be extremely disappointed in me for sure. should I "share" my steam ,origin and uplay with him. or should i "gift" him the accounts and stop playing all together myself!!!
torn apart between being a gamer and a father figure and in need of advice. Thanks guys

5 days ago

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Should I share with him my accounts

View Results
YES
NOOOOO
gift them to him
good old Potatoe

He’s got to start crafting his own persona at some point. Perhaps consider getting him some store credit if you have the means to help him get started. And maybe help him pick a good username.

5 days ago
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store credits instead of 5 years of online gaming progress!! i agree with you but i will kinda hate myself if i do that to the little guy.

5 days ago
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Is it a big deal for him? A few premium skins may be more than worth it for him depending on if he’s always been f2p until now.

If the progress loss isn’t a big deal for you, then maybe submit a ticket and see if they can basically rename your account to a name of his choice so you can recreate your account.

Also consider how much time you each have invested. I can see it going either way but my initial guess would be that you’ve spent far more time than he did progressing those accounts

5 days ago
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I don't know much about trading and stuff because I don't play online games that much, but if he creates his own account and you help him buy the games, can't you just send the in-game items?

5 days ago
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yeah store credit is a better alternative

5 days ago
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Why not family-share your Steam account with your nephew? I honestly don't quite see the problem here...

5 days ago
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family share doesn't share online games mostly .. and there's origin and uplay and epic!!

5 days ago
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Give him your epic account for his fortnite progress.
Epic is trash anyway, surely you didn't buy many games on that. :')

Give him some Steamstore credit and help him create his own account.
Throw some bundles onto it to fill it up to 60 simple games for under 10 bucks.

5 days ago
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+1

5 days ago
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Yeah, not a bad idea. But I wouldn't turn over your Steam account to him. He'll just have to cowboy up and re-earn some stuff himself. And it was only 5 years' worth because he didn't have access to the games 24/7. Now he will. In the ones he finds most valuable, he'll catch up quickly enough.

5 days ago
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Family share doesn't share the save data, which I think is a key part of what the nephew is angling for.
Local data could be transferred, but any online accounts wouldn't be transferrable, as they're bound to the primary steam account.

5 days ago
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I wouldn't risk sharing my Steam with my young teenage cousins, they asked multiple times, I denied, my brother in law agreed few years ago, they ran some cheats (ofc at first they calim they got their account hacked and it was someone else using cheats), got themselves VAC Banned, and he got VAC Banned as well in the process , because if someone cheats in shared game main account gets ban as well. Their explanation? After "someone hacked my account just to get me VAC banned" it was "It must be some kind of mistake, the website said cheats were not detected by Valve".

5 days ago
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Okay, your post is a bit unclear, so I'll approach it from two different interpretations:

If your nephew simply made a broad inquiry into whether sharing was possible, without being aware of the technical elements involved:

I can think of a method that'd allow for Steam account sharing [origin and uplay are probably lost 'causes, and I'm going to just assume you were kidding when you indicated caring whether or not you lose your epic account (:P) ], but it strikes me as being really too much of a hassle to bother with. By that point, you're probably just better off dropping the accounts, than trying to figure any workarounds out, if you're already feeling some inclination of dropping them to begin with. Nevertheless, having him get his own accounts and simply borrowing yours until he works his way through your current games is likely still a superior option if you don't have any special consideration toward yielding the accounts.

Of course, if your intention is to gift him a bunch of games as a sort of celebration gift of his first PC, in that case you can just think of it as a gift of games, rather than considering it as losing your collections. If you don't have any online-stored save data that you can't bear to lose, then there's really no harm in giving them the accounts. It's easy enough to rebuild game collections later on, if you get more interested in gaming again.

Flip side, he's 12. Regardless of how much he's been playing, unless he's a gaming prodigy or has been playing microtransaction games or similar, then it's extremely likely there's actually anything that he'd really hurt to lose. For things like online shooters, which seem to be the main focus, there's usually not much to lose by starting over to begin with; Unlocks can be reobtained, and skill ranking reearned. So there's not much 'cause to yield the accounts over if you don't have an inclination to do so.

If your nephew outright asked for your accounts:

If you teach him that he'll get rewarded for acting entitled, you'll risk utterly ruining him as a human being. With that as the alternative, there's basically nothing that'll justify giving him the accounts.

It'd have been a completely different thing if you'd offered it, but if he's asking for it, that means he already doesn't respect your considerations. Moreover, it also indicates that he either has a social perception issue or has already begun to develop an inflated sense of self-interest. At 12 years old, that's rather problematic behavior, regardless of the basis.

5 days ago*
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If your nephew outright asked for your accounts:

If you teach him that he'll get rewarded for acting entitled, you'll risk utterly ruining him as a human being. With that as the alternative, there's basically nothing that'll justify giving him the accounts.

It'd have been a completely different thing if you'd offered it, but if he's asking for it, that means he already doesn't respect your considerations. Moreover, it also indicates that he either has a social perception issue or has already begun to develop an inflated sense of self-interest. At 12 years old, that's rather problematic behavior, regardless of the basis.<

this

5 days ago
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WOW .. Thanks that was a great reply

5 days ago
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I had some grammar/arrangement mistakes, I just finished ediitng it.
If anything was confusing on your previous read, give it a fresh glance. :)

5 days ago
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No it was a model answer, if there are any :)
Thanks again

5 days ago
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I second Sooth's opinion. I agree that it would be better to have him start (and keep) his own account. Nevermind what you might lose were you to hand over your own, the kid needs to create one of his own, one he built himself and personalized. He should not have access to your "stuff" outside of family sharing. It's OK to let a small child use your account, but we're talking about a 12 year-old, here. There are people his age who are already taking on adult responsibilities and taking control of their own lives. He should stand on his own two feet.

It is the refusal to demand that children "grow up" which allows 45 year-old children to exist in our society.

5 days ago*
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How dare you make grammatical mistakes?
WHAT IS THIS? THE INTERNET?
We have a standard to uphold.
tldr :
I loved your answer. The part that slaps the kid for being entitled is the best.

5 days ago
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Slap that kid XD

4 days ago
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XD

4 days ago
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To add to Sooth's great reply, an additional argument to have him get his own accounts is that this way you two could potentially play together sometime.

But, really, 12-year-olds have all the time in the world. With his own accounts on his own computer, he'd be able to get back the progress in no time.

5 days ago
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an additional argument to have him get his own accounts is that this way you two could potentially play together sometime.

As an avid co-op gamer, I just can't support that sentiment enough. ^.^
Even putting co-op aside, if the kid is an FPS gamer, he may be interested in some Team PvP. There's a lot of potential for future bonding there. In that sense, the OP giving over their accounts [just to satisfy the child in the short-term] could be seen as a wasted opportunity.

5 days ago
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he should start all over . maybe give him some store credit to help him. so that he learns to value his stuff.

5 days ago
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Sharing should be fine but either way this is a discussion you should take with him. If he continues on a shared or gifted account, he might regret it later and have to deal with the consequences because it'll always be harder to start over the longer you've already been committed. That's why you should avoid sharing and have separate accounts from the beginning if you plan on any long-term usage. Most people prefer to keep their progress on personal accounts so unless he already knows that he'll never care about it, starting over now is better. I don't know about the particular games you mention but it should be possible to transfer some of his progress if the items are tradeable for instance.

5 days ago
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I agree that he should start over, but imagine your kid disappointed in you for video games!!

5 days ago
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Imagine him getting dissapointed over real life stuff then.

If you want to keep it, remember kids could do stupid things and chances are putting a VAC ban on your account.

5 days ago
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Yea that's why i wanted to save the disappointments for later serious stuff πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ and yes you are a spot on on the ban stuff.

5 days ago
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He's 12 years old. Stop mollycoddling him. They are just games. Luxury items.
How will he be able to deal with big RL disappointments when he never had to face small ones?
And how do you know he would be so disappointed? Maybe he would understand it if explained properly. Seems like you're too afraid of "being a disappointment". You're his uncle, you're supposed to help make a responsible, thoughtful adult out of him. That won't happen by avoiding conflicts or disappointments.

5 days ago
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Fortnite is free so you should've made him his own account to begin with if he played it so often. I'd also agree with helping him start over if you can spare the money, build up his own accounts and set of online games slowly so he learns various values of having his own stuff. Life skills and lessons, and I'm sure he would appreciate being the one to make his own account from scratch in the future. He may be disappointed now but the accounts were not his to begin with, even if he "worked" on them more than you.

Sooth made all the points I was thinking about too, unlocks can be re-obtained, some items transferable.

5 days ago*
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Valid points ... I think we'll have the talk

5 days ago
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Share the accounts but make him new ones for the new games he will be getting. Eventually those multiplayer games will die out, or he'll be bored with them and you'll have exclusive access to your accounts again :p

5 days ago
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That is the most practical solution yet ... Great idea that i will mostly do.. thanks for your brain:)

5 days ago
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One is glad to be of service :)

5 days ago
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My "too much of a hassle" idea was actually an extension of that basic concept.

In theory, you may perhaps be able to set both accounts to family share to one another, meaning you could still use your own account when he isn't (such as when he is using the other account for his new games), and you could use family share to access your local save games through his account. The complexity comes in with the fact that you'd have to disable mobile authorization on the accounts, or Steam won't let you freely use them across different computers.

Alternatively, add a third account (that'd be a second one for yourself), and have both the new accounts family share to your original account. You'd have to alternate on who has access to the original account (for the save files), which'd still require the disabling of mobile auth and account switching mentioned above.

Well, I'm not really overly familiar with family sharing or alternating accounts, so I don't really know which elements would or would not work. Even if it would work, I'd personally find it to be too much hassle, but I'll let you make the decision for yourself. :P

Local save games can at least be played in offline mode, usually, so you might not even need anything more than the basic concept to begin with.

I don't think the non-Steam clients have issues with being installed on multiple computers to begin with? So there the only concern would presumably just be in alloting who has account access, assuming they have similar considerations to Steam in regards to only allowing a single user to be playing through the account at one time [though even if they don't, the games in question presumably would].

5 days ago*
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Well, you already mentioned that idea in your previous comment but then kinda argued against it with the entitlement argument, which i actually agree with, I don't want him to feel entitled because life doesn't work this way, so after all i think we will have a talk ... He'll have to make new accounts for himself for future use but I'll share with him the games he currently invested in. I didn't expect this kind of mature knowledgeable discussion and I'm quit glad with all the replies actually. Thanks Sooth and thanks everybody.

5 days ago
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the games he currently invested in

which?

5 days ago
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Like someone else mentioned above, you should have given him his own Fortnite account, the game is free!
I can understand his frustration now, but life sucks and you don't always (almost never, let's be real here) get what you want or what you think you deserve, he will just have to start over, explain him why and if he gets mad about that, than that's his problem and not yours, he should appreciate you even let him play on your computer and accounts in the first place, sure he may be only 12 years old, but they are your accounts!

5 days ago*
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Help him with making his own accounts - He should be making his own choices in gaming. I played on my dad's accounts when I was young for online paid games, then I made my own steam account when I needed steam to play CS:S. He is 12. Not 5. I was creating my own accounts for games younger than that.

Once he has his own accounts, he then has the freedom to do what he wants with those accounts.

5 days ago
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I was downloading things also.
Wink.

5 days ago
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hahaha

5 days ago
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Online games are easy to grind if you have time. I wouldn't mind giving him the logins for those. But if we're talking about steam account that's a different story.

5 days ago
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Give origin, uplay and (especially) epic to him. Leave steam for yourself. If you'll ever want to play something that was on those other accounts - well, you'll have to buy it again. But how much could it be?

5 days ago
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The hate on epic is real ,i see πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

5 days ago
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In my case it's not really a hate, more like "who needs epic anyway?"

5 days ago
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I'd have made the same suggestion. Gift Epic, as it's unlikely that he owns plenty relevant games there. For the other accounts it would depend on the size of the library and how actively they are used. But by no means I would share accounts.

5 days ago
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Nah, I wouldn't share anything. Fact is that those accounts are yours and the kid's old enough to realize that. When breaking the news, feel free to sympathize with him a bit, but make sure he understands why you aren't giving him your account.

Offer to help him set up his own accounts. If you want to be a top tier uncle, then get him something to start him off. Some V-Bucks to kick off his Epic account and maybe the Season Pass (I think they're doing those) and a couple of fun games on Steam.

5 days ago
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Setting aside the issue of his motives, as well as the issue of the value of those accounts, for me the answer is still a strong: "Sorry, but it's not possible. It would be against the rules, and it would practically require me to stop using those accounts myself." Depending on his perceived motives, and on the way this request has been presented, and your refusal will be taken, I would decide, how much I want to help him in establishing his own accounts.

What you have been doing so far, seems to be within "family sharing" rules. What he asks for, would make you strongly break the rules. In case of a 12 y.o. this could set for him a very bad example, indeed becoming a starting point of future corruption.

It's not, that I'm 100% Lawful Good in my RL, actually I'm like 90% Chaotic Good. Sharing the account would be off limits for me, but gifting could become a choice under some circumstances, because I do not agree with the rules forbidding us from changing ownership of stuff, that we have acquired (it is a form of extortion for me, when we are practically forced to accept such rules). However, I strongly believe, that in a case of 12 y.o. (and especially, taking into the a consideration, that it's a 2k game account, which for him probably means "riches beyond imagination") it's too early for introducing him to such nuances.

Saying this, I would probably try to get those account transferred to his account by the particular games' support, but only after dealing with the issue of sharing. Especially, if it was only him playing those games, and there was only 1 active account created, there it seems at least worth a try.

5 days ago
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We need to learn frustration. This is a part of becoming an adult I think. :)

5 days ago
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FIRSTLY: He's your nephew, NOT your son - be careful not to usurp his parents responsibilities in raising him. Also make sure he realises that gaming is a privilege, and not a right.

I also have a nephew who recently got his own computer (turned 13 a few months back). I recommend setting him up with a new Steam account, and start offloading your bundle extras onto that account. I have a second Steam account. I added family restrictions to the account so that he just has access to games, and not to the steam community, store, etc - mainly cos of the huge influx of inappropriate game content on Steam nowadays that can still be visible at times - and also because I'm not his legal guardian and he doesn't live with me, this puts a reasonable safeguard in place that I can't actively monitor without. Obviously if he's playing multiplayer games this can make it tricky at times, but in general gameplay it is fine.

Outside of Steam, places like Uplay, Origin, etc have a clean storefront, so the social and visual interactions are less worrisome.

5 days ago*
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I'm really impressed and happy with how this conversation went on. Mature and constructive and understanding, unlike a co-worker who told me to grow up and leave the game to the kid. Thanks a lot guys. You are great and really helpful.

5 days ago
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That co-worker is obviously not a gamer.

5 days ago
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This coworker is not a parent. If he is he is not fit to be a parent.
Kids need to have boundaries. Not tight but also not loose.
( I am not a parent, I speak from experience)

5 days ago
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People that don't understand gaming are usually the ones with some kind of EQ issue; they can zone out to TV or movies and think that's "adult," but if it's interactive and more mentally stimulating...well, that's for kids. The perception is absolutely ludicrous.

Ignore your co-worker. That person is being a tool. I'm 47 and still game frequently (when work and life allow), and even game with my kids. Lots of fun and certainly superior to just binge-watching The Office for the 80-millionth time (although that IS a great show :D ).

5 days ago
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That's a very ignorant and dismissive attitude for them to take. Video games aren't just for children. Like many other forms of entertainment they are for people of all ages from all walks of life. You need not look any further than Shirley Curry, the Skyrim grandma for a perfect example of this. I wouldn't bother trying to convince such an ignorant person of anything though. In my experience it's a waste of time. Having said that, your family problem could be a far worse one so in a way it's fortunate that it isn't.

4 days ago
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For me, this is really more a matter of whether you really care about your accounts. If you don't game often, it would be pretty easy for you to start your own collection over. Personally, in a similar circumstance, I would just transfer the relevant accounts to my nephew and start over. It would be different if you were playing games often, but you seem pretty indifferent to it, whereas your nephew will most likely consider it the be the coolest thing a person has done for him.

5 days ago
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don't think he needs the privilege of a 2k games steam account from his uncle, he can rather make his own and use birthday giftcards etc. to get stuff that appeals to him. Neither uplay or origins seems like something you should simply hand over just cause he used these too from time to time. Fortnite however I totally think you can hand over, if he still enjoys the game and got lots of skins there...it's a kids game anyway :P

5 days ago
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I would use the family-share from Steam and give him the online accounts of whatever I wouldn't feel like playing anymore. Other than that I think the progress from the games can be transfered from a PC to another through flashdrives and such, so I would do that for the non-online games that the little guy was playing.

5 days ago
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Letting him play on your accounts instead of having him make his own for free games was a mistake.

Anyway I think you shouldn't give him your accounts, nor share with him (except for steam family sharing I guess). He has his own PC now, he should start over. He is only 12, he has all the time he needs to grind stuff again in those free games.

Also he shouldn't feel entitled to your accounts just because he played on them, instead he should be grateful he was allowed to use them in the first place.

5 days ago
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I would just give him my accounts and would start over myself :)

5 days ago
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As other people already said - at one point he will have to make his own account.
As he gets older this sharing will be more awkward and troublesome - especially since many people use steam as sort of social platform.

It may look like end of the world now, but honestly he will probably get over it faster than you think. Its possible that he will change games completely in year or two. Sooner you do it, less painful it will be.

If you really want to be "a father figure" than give him nice lesson about standing on your own feet and sweeten it up with pros like picking own nickname, avatars, being independent and making friends. ;p

5 days ago
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He needs to start all over on his own. He needs to understand that this is how it works.

5 days ago
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Since he is only 12, he can start over.

5 days ago
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well, since you already put it as an option, i'd say give him all your accounts except for steam.

5 days ago
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