I need some help/advice.

My son recently built his own computer. While cleaning up, I found an old computer with a 2TB seagate from about 5-10 years ago.
It’s installed in his computer, and I repartitioned it. Read/write was slow and would stop/start.
Tests show nothing wrong. But after I run extensive tests with seagate software, the drive cannot be detected at all. After a while (more than 5 minutes, less than an hour) the drive shows up again.

Every test indicates the drive is fine, but the stop-start access scares me. Any advice or tips or suggestions? Is the drive toast, or salvageable?
gift will appear here

1 month ago

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Smart is working? (CrystalDiskInfo / Hdd Health / etc.)

1 month ago
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Get him a ssd for windows, be a nice dad. :p

You could try defragging it for the slowness, not sure exactly about start/stop, also try other cables.

https://crystalmark.info/en/software/crystaldiskmark/ try both software too.

Also being so old i am really suggesting it's nearing it's end.

1 month ago
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Nice dad? I fronted half the cost because I refused to let him build a potato.
His computer is better than mine

1 month ago
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Hahaha!!! Same to me!!!!

1 month ago
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We aren't all rich :P

1 month ago
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Don't need 2 tb for windows, 64/128gb is enough for windows, and that shouldn't cost much. :)
Even handier, if your windows fails, you stilll got your games on a hdd (if it's not failing like this seagate seems to do, unless it's the cables).

I wasn't exactly rich either with 3 days of work back then, had a nice tax refund back when i bought a new pc and got a 240gb ssd and m2, still left with a spare 64gb ssd from my old pc doing nothing.. Ever since i been on wellfare. But i am on my own, so other priorities.

1 month ago*
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maybe the cable has a bad contact(or power cable)if test work XD as said above test crystal disk info for smart

1 month ago
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Make sure the SATA and power cable aren't loose at either end.

Have you tried reading the SMART logs with CrystalDiskInfo? If it says anything other than "Good" then the drive is pretty much dead.

Get a low level tool like SeaTools for DOS or MHDD. They're installed onto a bootable USB drive and they can "zero fill" your HDD, which is like a super format, and try to fix any bad sectors they find which can cause issues like yours. MHDD can also scan and repair without wiping data, I used that to fix multiple bad sectors on a ~15 year old HDD about 6 or 7 years ago. If the drive doesn't survive the procedure or still doesn't work after that, consider it dead.

1 month ago*
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Hey mate, as stated above it is best to make sure your cable is working properly and none of the sockets are damaged (might try a different socket on the mohterboard if possible).

Another good option would be to check if the voltage of your PSU is adequate for the build (if I remember correctly something to do with power spikes).

I am not too tech savvy so I am pretty sure to miss some basic, but ultimately you could try fiddling in the bios settings (although I would not recommend it).

1 month ago
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What kind of model is it though? If it's st2000dm001 then most likely it's done for good. These models were utter shit, I've bought several of them and all of them died after a couple of years.

1 month ago
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Ha! That’s the one!

1 month ago
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That's sad. But doesn't necessarily mean that my case is the same as yours, maybe you are lucky.
Check Windows' own Event Viewer and see if there are errors/warnings regarding bad sectors/unexpected HDD disconnects.
You can then try checking the surface with specialized tool (like Victoria for example).
How to check HDD with Victoria:

  1. Select your disk from the column to the right.
  2. Click on SMART at the top and see if there is anything wrong.
  3. Click on Test & Repair, check that 'Ignore' box is selected (not erase/write/refresh) and click on Scan. See if there are bad sectors.

Note: Considering it's 2Tb, you'll need at least 3-4 hours for the surface test to complete. During the test you shouldn't use that disk, so if it's being used as OS disk then you won't be able to test it properly via Windows shell, only in BIOS (which is complicated as Victoria doesn't like modern motherboards).

1 month ago*
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  1. Change the sata cable and put it if possible in a different ssd socket on motherboard.
  2. Change the power connector. If you dont have one spare from the power supply, just switch it with the one from the dvd or any other hdd you have.
  3. Touch with your hand your 2tb seagate. If it gets really hot try to place it directly in front of a fan.
  4. if you still have the same problem then im really sorry but you have to recycle it...
1 month ago
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Depending on what kind of data you're gonna use it for, I wouldn't risk using a drive that shows any sign of problems.

1 month ago
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Just for steam apps

1 month ago
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Also do you have any other drives connected? besides the 2TB. I've noticed some lanes are not good with multiple devices. What happens when you use a different lane / port

1 month ago
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It’s a brand new MOBO - a B550M. I doubt that’s the issue, but I plan on trying a different cable anyway

1 month ago
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Is it some kind of eco power saving drive? I think there are some that spin down after very short periods of inactivity to save power. I know windows has options somewhere to control when the drive spins up and down, but I'm not sure if you can override it on these specific drives.

1 month ago
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nah, it's just toast.

1 month ago
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I think it's a drive interface or cache issue. I once had a Seagate SSHD (a HDD hybrid with an ssd cache... weird thing, I don't think they make those any more... it wasn't a very good drive) with similar issues. Even if there's no bad sectors as such, it's probably not worth the trouble. You can use it as a dump drive perhaps? Plug it with an usb-converter and dump stuff on it you basically don't need any more ... any data that's not important, that you'd delete otherwise.

1 month ago
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Someone said that, right?

  1. Due to the cable / Connection failure
    (remove all cables from SSD side and motherboard side therapy&Then insert it again.Power cable, signal transmission cable.Did you insert both?)
  2. There is a format partition on the hard disk that is not used by Windows (remove all partitions that may have been used for another OS, then use it to install Windows. Use the CD boot removal tool)
  3. HD is broken (check with SeaTools)

For the time being, it may be a good idea to check for "SMART Error or hardware error" with a CHECK tool that can boot from CD.
Ultimate Boot CD - Overview http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/index.html
SeaTools | Seagate Support US https://www.seagate.com/support/downloads/seatools/#LocaleSelector

1 month ago
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If the cables are fine, then it's probably an issue with the circuit/i/o board on the drive, rather than the disks themselves (hence the reason the testing passed fine). If you're lucky enough to have access to another one of the same model, you could try swapping the boards over. Otherwise, just buy a new drive, 2TB drives are super cheap now.

1 month ago
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I've seen this happen when Seagate(Maxtor) armatures are failing, about to physically break at any moment. It's undetectable by software.
https://www.steamgifts.com/discussions/hardware 😉

1 month ago
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Try cleaning hdd contacts, something like that https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNMW5f6MZo0
It's pretty easy and safe, but you will need special screwdriver, like torx or something similar (depends on manufacturer).
Actually, I doubt it will work. But it won't hurt, so you can give it a try... other than that? Just buy a new one. Or even better - get ssd.

1 month ago
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just a suggestion, since the hdd is at least 5 years old and it's giving you trouble, don't waste time and effort and scrap it.

it has already proved to be unreliable. if it fails and you lose everything in it (even it's just movies and music), it will be a headache.

1 month ago
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I was hoping to give it to my son, but it's toast.

1 month ago
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I would suggest not getting a Seagate HDD, had one once and it died in three years, granted it was an external but all my other Toshiba externals and WD black internal drives have lasted over a decade now.

Normal hdds are also cheaper now especially compared to ssds.

1 month ago
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