I did a post 3 months ago, which I really liked as it sparked some deep and profound discussions. So I would like to do something similar.

This time I would like to discuss people whos' financial situation did a 180 turn in the last year. It may be for the better or for the worse. You may reveal as many details as you like, or keep as many as you like to yourself. The important thing is that we get a dialog and discussion going.

I will not put a giveaway here, but instead will pick commenters at random and will add them to my whitelist. I usually have at least 1 whitelist GA running at any given time, so hopefully this will be enough of an encouragement for people to participate in the discussion. To check if you're on my WL, click here.

1 week ago

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Why has your financial situation changed drastically (for better or worse) in the last year?

View Results
Much better: Finally found a job
Much better: Got a better job
Much better: Money fallen into my lap (inheritance, etc.)
Much better: Other
Much worse: Lost my job
Much worse: Got demoted / Forced to move to a worse position
Much worse: Health problems
Much worse: Lost a lot of money (Failed investment, stock market, gambling, etc.)
Much worse: Other

Why no neutral option?

Got some raise, but still not making enough should really get new job for that proper raise...

1 week ago
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Haha, thought about it as soon as I finished posting :D

1 week ago
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Because the question's about drastic changes, I'm guessing.

1 week ago
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Doesn't help that show results doesn't stick... As such neutral option is always good to not scew others.

1 week ago
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I agree, I would imagine there are a big percentage of us who's financial situation hasn't changed.

also, skew ;)

1 week ago
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also, "whose" :p
also, mayonnaise :D

1 week ago
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Also "ganja"

1 week ago
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Haha! Not so much a 180 exactly, but I went from not being in debt, to being in quite a bit of debt in the past month because I couldn't wait any longer to have much-needed surgery. Universal healthcare pftt. lol.

BUT... Maybe this time next year, it will have taken a 180 in a positive direction. :)

1 week ago
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The company I worked for closed down, and I haven't been able to find anything comparable. I mean, I could go work in fast food or something, but I'm holding out for a good job and its hard to keep up hope 24/7. Hopefully I'm able to find something soon, this is the longest I've gone without working since I finished school.

1 week ago
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I mean, I could go work in fast food or something, but I'm holding out for a good job

Don't worry about that, I'd say. You can totally take the job and keep hunting. Especially with the fast food industry, which has a rapid turnover, no one would begrudge you if you were working there and just quit in a month or two.
Plus, it'll just add experience to your resume, showing that in rougher times, you're willing to go on and work. Shows determination.

1 week ago
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Hope you find something soon!

1 week ago
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Well, I went from being living comfortably to contemplating applying for financial aid from my university.

With university, I can't go working full time and everyone else in my household is either unemployed or basically quit due to stress. It's a mess, but I'm not starving or anything, though no one can really reach that state in our country due to safeguards in place by the government. It's only your fault if you don't take advantage of the offered help.
Was contemplating even commenting this since this probably isn't a drastic enough change.

1 week ago
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everyone else in my household is either unemployed or basically quit due to stress

So they can't find work, but when they do, they quit because it's too stressful?

1 week ago
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EDIT: Emphasis on the "either".

1 week ago*
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I see.
So some had jobs but had to quit because they were too stressful. And others can't find jobs in the first place.
So do you think the people that quit because of stress, were in the right? or were they just being whiny?

1 week ago
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So some had jobs but had to quit because they were too stressful. And others can't find jobs in the first place.

That is correct. Though I've been vague. Probably on purpose since I'm not too comfortable with talking about my personal life on the Internet. But it's two people that I'm talking about. One quit for stress and the other's been essentially unemployed for years.

So do you think the people that quit because of stress, were in the right? or were they just being whiny?

I'd say so. He's been an extremely hard worker for 17 years at least now with I think almost 0 sick days in that time. But at the same time, he definitely stresses himself out a lot. He starts talking about the issue and you can hear how he winds himself up a lot when talking about it. So he quit in September and planned to take a rest until January. But since the government's paying him until the next September, he's basically riding that wave. But it's obvious that he's not working towards a real solution and that he's basically tasted the life of not working for money and he's probably gotten a bit addicted to it. He's justifying it to himself by saying he didn't take sick days during that time and that he worked for 17 years, but at the same time, that's what everyone does and that's just life. I respect what he's done by now and I supported him until January. Now I'm extremely skeptical of him and it's frustrating to see him complain about people leeching from the government when he himself is doing it. So now I don't really support him as much.

1 week ago
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I figured you were trying to be vague, so I was trying to be vague as well (talking about "them").

Working for 17 years, without taking any sick day is frankly horrifying to me. I probably live in a country with better working standards, as we have a mandatory number of sick days you get from your employer. And any sick days you don't use are transferred year-over-year. I can't say I used all the sick days I've gotten over the years (in various jobs), but I definitely use them when I need to, and even took 2-month sick leave once, when I needed to. All fully paid obviously. And now that I have kids - I can also you my sick days when my kids are sick and I need to stay home with them.

So hearing about someone unable to take sick days for 17 years sounds mind-boggling. That's like modern day slavery.

I hope he gets better, and finds the strength to find a new job soon.

1 week ago
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Other- Got a job, but money is still scarce since it's part time and I live in one of the top 3 most expensive states, in the top 2 most expensive counties.

Also makes it hard to move out.

Shame I'm not on your whitelist, but oh well. It happens.

1 week ago
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Much worst: I never got a job :(

1 week ago
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How long has the situation been like this?

1 week ago
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All my life

1 week ago
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So how do you get by? Does your family help?

1 week ago
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Why yes they do luv my family and I help around

1 week ago
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lost my job due to broken back
finances dont look too nice now

1 week ago
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Was it work related? Does your work compensate you for that?

1 week ago
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nope it wasnt. no compensation for me

1 week ago
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Are you paralyzed now?

1 week ago
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no im not but i cant lift much anymore

1 week ago
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I went from being unemployed long enough and having my unemployment benefits run out and needing to apply for government food assistance to getting a good paying job. Being broke for so long is awful, because you have no real choices as to what you can do. I had a friend who was in the same boat and that's all we could talk about because we weren't able to do much. "Man it sucks to be broke." "Yep." Signing up for government food assistance felt like a low point in my life. Probably one of the most depressing things I've ever done. Just being able to go out to eat or buy something for myself feels like a luxury.

1 week ago
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How did that happen?

1 week ago
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Which part, exactly? I lost my job a rather ordinary way, with my company cutting costs and eventually going out of business. I looked for work for a long time, which was miserable because 99% of anyone that I interviewed said they'd get back in touch with me but never sent so much as a form email back. I got my current job because I knew someone who worked there and they recommended me to their boss.

1 week ago
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Does it count if the 180 was more than a year ago but the reason is still valid?

I was working multiple small jobs (each taking anywhere from 2 to 15 hours a week, changing over time) that aggregated an okay bit of pocket money. In a fairly short time frame, and for multiple reasons, one source dried up after the other, until I was left effectively unemployed, so I guess that counts as "lost my job". My family keeps a roof on my head and such, but I've been running a deficit for all the expenses I'm still in charge of. It's only thanks to the (admittedly not that big) savings I'd accumulated that I can keep running a deficit for the time being. I mentioned my current situation in your previous thread; this is the story of how it became a thing.

I've since changed direction and started to work on something that will not provide any financial return for the time being but should eventually help me do a new 180 (the government job I mentioned in that comment). Hopefully I'll get the decent job I'm aiming for. But for now I'm just making sure nothing blows up on my face.

1 week ago*
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Do you think the situation in your country will change any time soon?

1 week ago
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It will change, yes, but there's a question of where we'll head from here. We need some pretty major changes to pass to allow the economy to get any real recovery; if that fails to happen, we're headed towards the abyss.

I don't want to get technical, so let me try to explain this simply. The public sector spends far more than the money it makes, and we're no longer at a situation where you can handle that by raising taxes. We have a Norway-tier tax level, but our public services are... yeah... let's not go there. Anyway, there's no room to increase taxation any further; we're at the point where you hurt the economy so badly by adding even more tax that it results in businesses closing and such and then you collect less tax overall despite increasing the rate.

We have a large-ish public debt (measured as a percentage of national GDP), but that's not that much of a problem (beyond being a pointless money sink). The problem is that, when you run a deficit, your debt also grows in nominal value, and you need to keep that growth in check by not letting it grow more than your GDP. Our debt is currently growing at a highly alarming rate. It's a huge issue, because when debt is snowballing, it doesn't take a genius to figure out that eventually you won't be able to pay, so nobody wants to lend money anymore, and eventually the state is completely paralyzed. If we collected enough tax to be able to do public investment without depending on loans, that wouldn't be a problem... but if we did, we wouldn't be in such dire straits to begin with.

So the question is, will our congress understand that we need major changes to the structure of public spending and make the unpopular changes that are necessary to save the country from itself? If it does, the economy will start to recover and this very year we'll already have an acceptable amount of growth. If it doesn't, we're just doomed, because the problem is already in a downwards spiral that you can't stop without a significant change. The answer to that question is still up in the air, but the winds, which were heavily favoring "no" throughout most of last year, seem to be changing towards "yes". I'm not enough of a dreamer to say that a very good change will come out of our legislative branch, but I'm fairly confident that we'll be able to at least avert disaster and probably fix some long-term issues that should've been fixed 20+ years ago while at that.

1 week ago
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So I presume the solution is to cut public spending, which will probably result in worse conditions to the citizens in the short run - so nobody wants to do it, because it will make them unpopular to the masses. Correct?

And the masses themselves don't care what the government does, as long as nobody hurts their way of life...

1 week ago
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Pretty much. Except we can't cut public spending anymore. We already have no investment to speak of. The largest amounts of public spending is with retirement pensions, followed by payroll. Then there are constitutionally set amounts that must be applied to health, education, and so on, and it would be political suicide to touch these minimums (whether they're useful, and whether there's even anything to cut, remains to be seen). Some state-specific things, like police, just can't be stopped.

The only thing we can do is make sure that spending grows more slowly from now on. And that means tackling the greatest factory of public spending: retirement pensions. In Brazil, we unfortunately have a culture of wanting to retire and then throw our legs up the table and do nothing. I expect you can see where this is going, yes?

Fortunately, people are already starting to figure out that the problem isn't the retirement pension of the masses earning 500 USD a month, but the pensions of those earning 5000+ or even 10000+ USD a month (and some crazy egregious cases even go beyond that, like 25k+ or even more). Another important and highly unpopular part is enforcing a minimum retirement age on everyone, as we have a situation where the masses already retire late-ish but the educated people with higher salaries, and thus higher pensions, retire early, sometimes as early as 50. It's important to stop people from retiring at 50 with 10k+ USD a month precisely because those people will spend the next 30 years sucking that money out of everyone's pockets. And those people, who are a sort of 1%-style group, tend to be pretty well organized and have a high ability to lobby our congress.

So the long and short of it is that it greatly depends on two factors: how well the government can explain to the masses that they're the ones least affected and how much that can be explored to make the people lobby the congress in order to counter or balance the lobby from those 1% folk.

1 week ago
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Does that mean the country pays for everyone's retirement? I hope that people at least pay taxes accordingly.

From what I know in most countries people assign some of their income towards their pension (like 401k in the US) and when they retire, they get the money they themselves saved all their life. What you're describing sounds more similar to the USSR - where everybody would work for the country, pay no taxes, and the country would pay everybody's pensions when they retire.

I'm not sure how that's supposed to work in a modern country with a free market, and discrepancy in salaries you describe (where people earn money privately and not from the government).

The question is how many of these rich people are out there? If there are very few of them, then even if they get a lot of money it doesn't matter. For example, if it's 10,000 people, even if you cut $10,000 from each, that's only 100 Million dollars - won't save anyone.

1 week ago
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There are taxes that are directed to funding that system, yes, and a part of it is levied upon your salary. It's just that they're not enough by far. That system runs a gigantic deficit of over 50 billion USD a year, and growing. The idea is that it should work akin to a mandatory retirement fund (like 401k), except managed by the government. That's not a bad idea in and of itself; it's just that it's bleeding money like the end of time.

In this change, no money will be cut from the earnings of those already retired, since it's what we call an "earned right" in legalese, and those can't be touched. What we can do is plug the leak for the people who still haven't retired.

The amount of people earning high pensions is pretty considerable. There are a number of people in ridiculously well-paying jobs in the public sector, some in ways that make no sense whatsoever, and those are the ones with the largest pensions. Some years ago, there was a change so that people to join the public sector have an upper cap on their pension (the same as the cap for the private sector), because it was uncapped before (set by the salary). Still, many people were already working and will receive their full salaries as pension. People earning 5k, 10k USD a month in a country where minimum wage is less than 300 USD a month. There are likely about half a million such people out there (our population is like 208 million or so). Every time someone retires, the public sector needs to hire someone else, and pay that new salary. Meanwhile, in the private sector, just having educated people with well-paying jobs work 5, 10 years more while not paying pensions for the same time period also helps enormously.

When you add all the changes, they're talking about something like 250 billion USD over the next 10 years. Fun fact: that means that the retirement system will still be running a large deficit. It's just a smaller, more manageable deficit that doesn't make it impossible for the government to do anything else. And more important still: it does something about the explosive growth curve of that deficit. I'm no specialist, but I understand that the tendency is for it to more or less stabilize, or at least grow much more slowly.

BTW, thanks for the WL! :D

1 week ago
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Wow! That just mindblowing!

Ok, but here's a thought. The country/government can cut the pensions of the people already retired (maybe even temporarily, but probably permanently) and do this scalably (the more you receive, the bigger the cut for you). Because some unhappy people with a functioning country are better, than some happy people in a country that's falling apart. And when things turn around - the country can return to paying larger pensions.

Because what good will these people have from their pensions, if the country defaults, and there is hyperinflation, and in the end nobody get nothing.

Wouldn't it be better for everyone to accept austerity measures (even temporarily) that will allow the country climb out of the recession (I presume it's in) and start turning things around - before it's too late.

1 week ago
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Yes (technically you wouldn't cut the pension but levy some form of tax over it, which has the same end effect; I'm not sure about the legality of it under our system but that's a different discussion). The problem is, are our legislators willing to do that when they're thinking in terms of what helps them win the next election?

That's usually the underlying problem with passing austere changes: those are complex issues most people don't really understand, so they reset to just "staring at their belly buttons" while "the circus catches fire", as we say here (i.e. care about their own problems while everything falls apart), not realizing that they're also going to be hit by the shockwaves once everything eventually implodes.

Technically we're not in recession anymore, but that's there the good news ends. The results of that recession include massive amounts of unemployment and underemployment and our per capita GDP getting set back by about a decade. And because of the fiscal issue with rapidly growing debt, nobody wants to invest, which paralyzes further growth. So we're stuck with what amounts to microscopic growth (effectively about none if you look at it per capita). We got our head out of the water, so at least we're no longer sinking, but we still need to be rescued, and the sea is having quite the crazy storm. :( It may no longer be recession, but that isn't saying much.

1 week ago
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"staring at their belly buttons" while "the circus catches fire"

Nice one :)

Does Latin America have mutual economical treaties? Like when Greece was at the brink of default a couple of years ago, the EU countries bailed her out and gave her loans, because it's in their best interest to have a stable and prospering neighbor. Can the same happen in Latin America?

1 week ago
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We have some weaksauce stuff like the Southern Common Market and the Andean Community, but nothing anywhere close to the European Union level. Besides, every country here is fucked to some degree or another; it's not like we have a Germany to keep shit running (in fact, Brazil is the closest thing to that, and look at where we are).

1 week ago
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Maybe US could have done that, If only it had different leadership...
(after all it's in their best interest too)

1 week ago
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It sadly appears our Social Security is heading to the exact same place described by Cassol. Our family was having a discussion a week ago about some news heard recently about (and I'm going to get the numbers wrong) it running out of money within 25 years. All the people who have been paying taxes into it rightfully expect money from it. However, with the overall budget deficit exploding like it has been most of this millennium, government keeps borrowing from (or, like Illinois, not funding) the retirement funds. Add all the new retirees and the thankfully longer life-expectancy post-retirement, and money is going out of those funds at an alarming rate. However, our government doesn't seem willing to address this budget deficit by cutting spending (and--as unpopular as it might be--raising taxes on some).
We have had companies bail out of the US only because of our high tax rate. Yet without cutting spending, we cannot afford to cut taxes by a penny.

As most retirees and soon-to-retirees already know, Social Security is slated to run out of money in 2034 and, unless changes are made between now and then, beneficiaries beginning in that year will receive only 79% of what they otherwise would be owed.
--https://www.marketwatch.com/story/how-likely-is-it-that-social-security-will-go-broke-2019-01-07

Frankly, unlike the author, I hold out little hope that the necessary changes will, in fact, be made.
With our ever-ballooning debt of 22.123T USD (as of this writing), I do not expect there to be room to fund retirement funds in future years.

As a share of the U.S. economy, the national debt stood at 78 percent of GDP in 2018. But the CBO says it will rise to 93 percent by the end of 2029. Again, those numbers put the ratio at levels not seen since just after World War II.
--https://www.npr.org/2019/02/13/694199256/u-s-national-debt-hits-22-trillion-a-new-record-thats-predicted-to-fall

Ouch.

1 week ago
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Ouch indeed :(

1 week ago
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Got a long overdue raise but I still work somewhere I'm not happy
Didn't get hired x3 when solliciting last year

I would even say I'm unhappier now since it feels like I'm stuck when I can't change jobs because you don't get hired

1 week ago
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At least you have a job. I'm sure you'll find something better eventually.
After all, every day you work, is one more day of experience you earn.

1 week ago
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I lost my job at the end of January so a lot worse for me currently. I'm hopeful that I'll be able to find something soon, but at the moment the only thing I really have to look forward to with some degree of expectation is seasonal work over the Christmas period.

1 week ago
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So sorry to head that :(

1 week ago
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You need a "Things are bad but I'm turning it around" option :P Three years ago my uncle died and left a house FULL of hoarding back to the 50's...not good hoarding like microwaves doors and empty picture frames. It was all paperwork from every business he had for all those years. At least 20 different businesses, from real estate to internet...stuff. 100's of banker boxes full with money located all over. Two years ago my mom and I went though all of this tracking it all down and I had to back away from my business to help with that. Last year after we paid out the estate his family decided to involve lawyers and come after us. 8 months later they took the amount they were offered since we did nothing wrong. But 8 months of lawyers and paperwork was rough. During that my dad had emergency surgery and has had a long recovery and I slowed down to help with that. 8 years of 25% or more growth per year gone. Lost over $25,000 two years ago and $20,000 last year.

But now those horrible relatives are gone and dad is better. So I'm turning it around. I've been tuning a steady profit since the end of November. Two years ago was bad, then last year was rock bottom but so far this year things are getting better :D

Reminds me of a joke I heard years ago (maybe by Winston Spear?) that went something like this: "The phone rang and it was the electric company calling to tell me they are turning the power off. I said honey, the phone's back on, things are lookin' up"!

1 week ago
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Haha, that's a funny one :D

Hope your year continues to look up!

1 week ago
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Yep, that joke is good. Most people have some kind of inspirational quote or something like that to think of when it gets rough...for me it's that joke :)

Thanks :D

1 week ago
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I managed to graduate about a year and a half ago, amidst a really tough time for me (my girlfriend left me some time ago, and my grandpa whom I had been living with the summer prior passed away), and I spent the following three months barely getting out of bed.
I ended up finding a job 2 hours away from the city where I had always lived, so I moved to a new place, started fresh.
Financially I cannot say that I got much richer or anything, but I got an income, so that's a good thing.

1 week ago
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That's rough man... Hope your year continues to look up!

1 week ago
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Mom has retired, so less money coming in.
I am looking for a better job and might get one tomorrow.

1 week ago
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Wishing you good luck! :D

1 week ago
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thx

1 week ago
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Success

1 week ago
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Yay! :D

1 week ago
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Do you still live with your mom?

1 week ago
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no

1 week ago
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Technically this happened the year before and has just happily continued this year. I'd been working retail forever, I was a full-time lead, but the company I worked for decided to phase out all full-time employees that weren't managers and make us all part time. I started applying for jobs to make up the difference. During this time my mother was having health issues and had to have open heart surgery... so I ended up burning all my savings to go visit her for what could possibly have been the last time. THANKFULLY she survived her 20% chance of death, and when I got back from the trip I got a call for an office job that I had honestly forgotten I had applied for (Y'know.. stress n' all). It pays notably more than the retail job and has very constant hours with good benefits and just... everything about it is great. The only not-so-great thing is that I went to school for biology and am not using that degree in any way shape or form... but whatever I'll live.

1 week ago
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Congrats on the new more stable job! Happy your mom survived. Maybe it's not Biology, but you never know it could lead into that field some day through connections. I studied Accounting, but ended up as a Project Assistant. I love numbers, but somehow tracking the progress of construction projects through analytics had its own reward. I'm sure you'll find a lot of underlying similarities from working in the lab as in the office. Good luck! WL 💙

1 week ago
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Were your previous job related to Biology? Or both jobes unrelated?

1 week ago
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The job I had while going to college was retail (Furniture and home decor accessories), It was a nice job but... it's retail. I don't really blame the company for phasing out the position that I had since brick and mortar retail stores are struggling pretty badly and I imagine they'll be more or less 'gone' sometime in the future. As for actual biology jobs I applied to several but never actually got hired. One in particular that seemed to be going really really well ended up having their funding cut, then the job opened up again, their funding got cut AGAIN, and then after a third round of me applying having really a really good interview experience, and then finding out that they hired nobody because their funding had cutbacks and they couldn't afford that extra worker... after 3 rounds of that it made me wonder if maaaaaybe I should look for something 'stable' since imagine how awful it'd be if I HAD been hired at the lab and then they had their funding cut after a few months or something and I got laid off. Also worth noting I only have an associates in biology because I was concerned about the money/debt needed to go all the way. Most likely if I do go back to college it will be for finance now. My bio background has helped in the office in some odd ways since I have a dramatically different perspective on things compared to most of my peers which helps with brainstorming solutions.

1 week ago
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Well good luck with the new job!

1 week ago
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Can't fit to any of the options but I work at weekends and study the rest of the time. It pays the university bills and I still have some spare change left for myself. That is because my parents give me food and rood :D

1 week ago
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Another: My country is sinking as fuck. Argentina is doomed.

1 week ago
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That's rough :(

Do you see any change that might happen in the near future?

1 week ago
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Yeah, the frist african country outside of Africa.

1 week ago
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I lol'd. But you mean Venezuela hasn't snatched that title? :)

From here in Brazil I'm not quite sure how things are going there, but I recall that Cristina defaulted like twice and I thought that Macri had managed to stop that. With that said, I don't really know the details. What's causing it to sink? Other than rising sea levels, that is.

1 week ago
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Macri's slogan was "We are the change". They are the same as the previous government, but with good manners and a more sophisticated and planned robbery.
I voted him because what his team propposed was what we needed, honestly. But they raped our entire society.

When he assumed, the real dollar costed around $16 pesos argentinos. Now it's around $42.50. The services went so fucking high, along with debts interests (CFT 150% average).

So yeah, we're getting gangbanged each day.

Oh, and more venezuelans and immigrants from other countrys come here to work for barely nothing and there are no jobs for argentinians. Add that too.

1 week ago
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That sounds pretty awful. :|

1 week ago
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Well, I'm not officially "better off" just yet. I've been job hopping for the last two years just to make ends meet and even beforethat wasn't great. I just completed a big move and I've been at my new job for a week. It's not fantastic pay, but it's a lot better than what I had, is actually in a relevant field, AND has a ton of room to grow (even without a direct promotion, this position can go up to $25/hr). The big test will be seeing if I can avoid fucking it up.

If I can hold on to it, I might FINALLY be financially stable after such a long time . Going even further, I could potentially have disposable income again.

1 week ago
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Good luck with that!

1 week ago
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12/03/2018:
I was working as computer technician for a service provider

16/04/2018:
I got the same job (but known as level 1 computer technician) in a hospital

01/02/2019:
I got promoted at the hospital (level 2 computer technician)

When i got the new job (16/04/18) i moved to another neighborhood and i started living alone
So, my life is really better now

1 week ago
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Hope your year continues looking up!

1 week ago
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Thanks mate, the best for us!

1 week ago
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I will get some money next year from a heritage

1 week ago
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Who are you planning on helping to 'accidentally' die?

1 week ago
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😁
he already died, I was just to young to get it yet

1 week ago
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Ah, that sounds a bit less morbid. :D

1 week ago
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Spent it wisely m8. Or better, keep it until you really need it.
just some advice from an old guy ;)

1 week ago
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I'm not someone, who throws money out of the window just because I have it
I'll probably donate some for people who need it more right now, and then I will mostly save the rest.

1 week ago
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I took a voluntary demotion, but I'm still financially stable enough to pay all my bills and eat out a couple times a week. I'd like to do more volunteer work and find new hobbies. My previous job was too stressful. Hoping to get a better job in the future, but right now enjoying not working overtime at home and on the bus. Work-life-balance is much more important to me. Right now, I'm enjoying my time playing games :3

1 week ago
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So you wanted to get demoted, to have a less stressful job?

1 week ago
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Yep. Despite all my overtime I was not meeting all my goals. My performance review was terrible so getting a job elsewhere in the same company was going to be difficult. Plus many of the departments I wanted to work for we're only hiring entry-level, so I took a demotion, so I could temporarily move under a new manager and role. The deadlines now aren't so strict so I can actually meet them. I'll work on fixing my image and preparing myself for a better role.

1 week ago
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That's pretty smart.
Good luck with that!

1 week ago
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Thanks :D, Also, cool thread idea BTW! You never know what someone is going through until you ask.

1 week ago
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So a strategic "Lateral move for career growth". I hope it goes well for you, I feel like less stress is worth way more than higher pay. Even if you were meeting deadlines, constantly working overtime and being stressed out makes it very difficult to think about any sort of career growth or self development.

1 week ago
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Thanks! That's a good way of phrasing it :D Lateral moves are okay by me at this point in my career.

1 week ago
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managed to move into the field i wanted, I am earning a bit less than before and also less benefits but it should be good for the long once i'll have real exp in the new field.... if brexit doesn't destroy everything

1 week ago
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Good luck!

P.S.
Can't they cancel Brexit?
It doesn't look like anybody wants it anymore...

1 week ago
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Russia still wants Brexit to happen

1 week ago
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Potato answer missed

1 week ago
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Officially, I'd say that this month I'm making exactly one year of being a caregiver for my grandmother, unofficially more than 3 years taking care of my grandmothers, but it is nice to know that after all the paperwork, bureaucracy and struggle I finally managed to get this stable income while also doing what I've been doing voluntarily for so long.

View attached image.
1 week ago
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Good for you!

1 week ago
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A court case I've been in for the last 2½ years finally reached its end. And while I technically won. It was not by as much as my lawyer and I hoped, so suddenly I owed the other guy 7000$. Still better than the 14000$ I would have owed him if I lost. But that resulted in me not having much money left over each month since I now have to pay that.

1 week ago
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So you both owe him money AND needed to pay for a lawyer to reach that conclusion?

1 week ago
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Nah lawyers are free to me because I am a student.
Gotta love the Danish system.

1 week ago
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At least you got that.
If you had to pay for the lawyer as well, I'm not sure you would have benefited at all from the trial...

1 week ago
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Lawyers are not that expensive. At least not in my country.
My roomie used one last year and for 6 meetings + 3 court meetings he had to pay 560$

1 week ago
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