Bought a key on G2A.com (I know, my fault...), it was a dupe (key already used), contacted the seller (no response), filed a ticket (claim) under G2A's "Money Back Guarantee" - and what did they answer?

I need to report the "fraud" (maybe it was just a mistake?) committed by the seller to the local police or my claim will be denied. I should use the information from the receipt to identify the seller. The "bill" contains "seller ID: b6693a9f-301f-4609" as the only information about the seller.

Are they serious? This is just a "fuc* you" answer that they are not even thinking about refunding my money and don't care about their promise:

When does Money Back Guarantee apply?
If a digital item you purchased on G2A.COM is not as described, doesn’t work or has been removed from your account, you will receive a refund.

I read that G2A is a shady company from other complaints, but now I have experienced it myself. Here is their "reply" to my claim. What do you think?
My next step will be to bring this to our customer rights protection organisation, they love to sue companies over their unlawful EULAs.

#########################################

Dear User,

Thank you for applying to the Money Back Guarantee program!

Its purpose is to help G2A.COM users get their money back if a product they bought isn’t as described, doesn’t work or stops working and a compromise with the seller could not be reached. You can learn more at https://supporthub.g2a.com/marketplace/en/money-back-guarantee and in our terms and conditions: https://www.g2a.com/terms-and-conditions, point 6.23.

Before we move forward with your application, two steps are necessary:

1. First, you need to report the fraud committed by the seller to the local police or other appropriate authority in your area.
2. Next, send us a scan of the official document confirming a report was filed. The document should include:

• Your first and last name
• The price of the product
• The name of the product
• The seller's data (such a first and last name, address, user ID, nickname etc., anything that helps the police identify the seller). All this data can be found in the receipt for the order: https://www.g2a.com/sales/order/history
• Official stamps confirming the authenticity of the report

Without such a document, your application will have to be declined.

We are waiting for your reply.

With best regards,
G2A Team

6 days ago

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Is G2A.com a trustworthy company?

View Results
Yes
No
They are the worst professional scammers in the gaming industry

i have no words that is a new low from them, post this on reddit too

6 days ago
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Just dispute it with paypal (hopefully you used paypal), they'll never reply, you get your money back and be banned to use G2A forever but that's about enough you need to know about G2A.

6 days ago
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"I read that G2A is a shady company from other complaints, but now I have experienced it myself."

There is a reason why G2A is censored on Steam so you can't write the page address or name in any comments and why G2A is on the list of fraud key sellers by Steam.

6 days ago
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Just file a report with these:
Bartosz Skwarczek
G2A.com Ltd
31/F, Tower Two, Times Square,
1 Matheson Street, Causeway Bay,
Hong Kong

6 days ago
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I will do that, thanks! Should have had the idea myself.

6 days ago
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Seems it has been like that since this wonderful feature was implemented
which might shed some light as to why, developers weren't so keen on signing for that key-blocking tool, at least if we expect the same level of insanity
It's a good feature rendered pointless, intentionally

6 days ago
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If you paid with a credit card, Paypal, or other service that has similar policies, I would just make sure you have used any previously bought keys from G2A (in case they close your account) and do a charge back. You did not receive what you paid for, if they don't want to provide you with a replacement or a refund, take the money back without their permission.

6 days ago
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Create a support ticket on Steam with the key you used so that they can show you when it was activated (I've made a similar request before) , take a screenshot when you got the response with time and if its before your purchase then send it through to G2A, they can't argue against facts like that... they will maybe try but yeah ...

6 days ago
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Why would they need to argue about anything when their terms clearly say that filing an impossible police report is absolutely necessary.

6 days ago
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Or just keep on making tickets, I sold a game on G2A to someone and then they claimed it was a duplicate, I contacted steam support to show me when the key was activated and it was activated 2 hours after the game was bought from me...

So after showing that to G2A I won the support ticket, 2 days later the guy made another ticket for it and I was away for more than 4 days ... he won the ticket because I didn't respond back and bam took the funds directly out of my account...

So in conclusion, if you got a dupe just keep on making tickets until you get your refund XD

6 days ago
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Steam support tells you the activation date?? That would be cool.

6 days ago
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Yup they gave me an activation date, though you need to word it right, don't say 'I bought a game from G2A" haha then they won't help you.

Rather say a developer or friend provided you with a key but it is showing it is a duplicate, could you perhaps see what date it was activated on as that would help the friend or dev know that it didn't come your way, some nonsense like that haha, can't remember what my wording was

6 days ago
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Seems with Steam's "new" support system you cannot write directly to them anymore... how did you contact support?

6 days ago
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they can't argue against facts like that

They can just claim, that the screenshot is fake

6 days ago
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to the local police...
made my day :D

6 days ago
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Even your local police would appreciate the joke

6 days ago
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To your sheriff lol

6 days ago
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well, it's G2A

6 days ago
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How much are we talking money wise for the game (singular?) you purchased?

It's not to hard to envision a possible good-faith argument in contrast that's rooted around some official authority interaction for matters in the hundreds of dollars or so.

Of course, presumably you're talking a normal key purchases here, and in which case that's almost certainly an artificial difficulty barrier being imposed of no practical value that's time-consuming and obnoxious in order to minimize rightful refunds for faulty product sales.

.
====Rest of the post is just me going on tangents mostly::====

In my experience Kinguin has always been far worse than G2A, so If this thing sticks, I'd expect to see them doing the same or similar soon. Just like they followed through to charge "buyer protection" extortion fees for simple due-diligence, and they started unloading "mystery keys" in the most classic of raffle-scam styling. G2A is usually the easy scapegoat for the whole big back of dicks.

Still, I'm always weary of budding hate-trains on G2A-esques since the gaming industry can manipulate that amorphous spite into going past the reasons people are upset with ResellerSite643 and lay groundwork to invalidate consumer/property rights with even greater monopoly protections on their products and excuses to invalidate unused keys unilaterally by force. Upfront consumers have got these universal. legitimate complaints about their shady business practices and unethical behavior going on the exchange sites, but there's this secondary push by the game industry side to use that as a scapegoat to curb exchange at all and stop on basic consumer rights, ownership, and right of resale stuff too. Just a reminder that my enemy's enemy isn't always my friend.

6 days ago
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Imo Kinguin is gar better than g2a and i never Had Problems with them, even selling on there

6 days ago
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Never use such a shady shit company for BUSINESS stuff that involve your payment and adress infos.
Take it as payment to learn that lesson

Sometimes are cheaper not really better...

6 days ago*
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That's actually the correct way this should be done. All sites that involves third party sellers should do the same because scammers can't get away with their actions. Authorities must be contacted because internet isn't no man's land. If you get involved with a fraud online, this should be investigated like any other crime. The problem seems to be scammers make you believe there's no rules on internet, but the real problem are the victims that believes there's no rules on internet.

6 days ago
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So just contact the Chinese authorities to report the huge scam? I'm sure any local cops are super interested in investigating someone losing couple bucks to a Russian scammer on a Chinese scam platform, or anything similar. They will get the best Interpol has to offer on the case.

6 days ago
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If you are Chinese, yes. You are the victim. You pay taxes to make authorities work. Every country has tools to investigate international crimes. There's even international agreements to colaborate with investigations of crimes beyond borders. If the authorities feel Interpol has to get involved, they will contact them (they will because that's their job). Also, authorities don't have to "feel interested" to investigate something. In brazil we have a crime called "prevarication", that is, basically, a crime commited by an authority that doesn't do something that should be done. I'm pretty sure every country has something similar. Public agents don't serve themselves, they serve the... public.

6 days ago
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No, the scam Platform is Chinese. No country has that kind of tools to investigate crimes in countries that don't want to co-operate, outside spy level stuff. Nor are they even remotely interested in investigating couple bucks. Just look at all the Nigerian letter scams, have you ever heard of anyone getting their money back from Africa?

You should watch less tv shows and read more news to find out that even the Brazilian justice system just isn't perfect and doesn't work overseas.

6 days ago*
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I'm a lawyer, I worked for the government, I also worked at the local police station, I still have the contact with federal agents that I met when I was workig for the governemnt and I know enough to tell you ,at this point, that seems you know less than basics to understand how the basics work. I'll let you go to Canada to report a crime when a Canadian steals you. Even better, I'll let you think that Africa is responsible to do anything against a Nigerian, because, somehow, this makes sense in your world.

6 days ago
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Yeah right. How many cases of lost $2 dollars to international crime did you hear got even investigated let alone solved during your career? 0? How surprising.. You're confusing $2 with $2 million maybe? That they would probably start investigating.

How about you actually ask your "federal agent" friends what they would do if you told them that you got scammed $2 by some Russian kid on a Chinese platform. They will 100% surely tell you that no such thing would ever get investigated because it will 100% surely lead to nothing at all happening even if by some magic ball they managed to find the kid.

6 days ago
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Looks like you rule your life on presumptions and suppositions. My condolences!

6 days ago
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Nope, my life is ruled by realism which you seem to lack. I'm sure having such idealism feels nice tho, believing in things that everyone else knows just don't work.

Did you ask the federales yet?

6 days ago
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Another presumption over the previous presumptions! Nice bro!

6 days ago
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So your whole story seems to be made up, can't be that hard to call an old friend to ask about something. Cool story bro!

6 days ago
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Yeah, because I need to call a friend to know something I already know, something that also is public by my country law that came from international agreements. You don't know the basics and presume everything else, presuming nexts suppositions using previous presumptions. That's a new level of cotton candy world.

6 days ago
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So how many $2 have you heard got recovered from China or Russia? Why are you unable to answer this simple question about something you pretend to know so well? Just one answer is all we need, can you manage that?

6 days ago
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Even better, I'll let you think that Africa is responsible to do anything against a Nigerian, because, somehow, this makes sense in your world.

This wasn't enough to give you a hint?
Do you also think that you should report to authorities with the intention "recover" something from a criminal? You must get really mesmerized when a thief gets in jail and the victim didn't recover their stolen goodies. Really really mesmerized... Seems that you don't even know the purpose of any criminal system at all.

6 days ago
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Yes, it was enough to give me the hint that you're a little kid with no idea of the real world. Still no number I see? How many times, you can call the federal friends to ask if they know of one ever happening as well.

Yeah I'm sure your local cops will first hack and investigate the Chinese server to find out the Russian IP and other info, then fly to Russia and hack the ISP and fly the kid back to Brazil while evading FSB putting them in a gulag. All this just for $2 and you imagine you're living in a real world and not some movie..

Why do you imagine these scammers operate in countries like that?

6 days ago
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Now read your own comment and tell me, who is watching movies thinking world works like that?
You answered your own question in a very subjective way. Thank you.

6 days ago
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No, you're the one thinking the real world works like a movie. I was merely illustrating how foolish your fantasy is in reality. Of course nothing like that would never happen, which proves my point and that you're full of BS.

Or alternatively since you know everything about international laws, tell us how it would work in your opinion? Educate us about the power of Brazilian authorities by giving real world examples?

6 days ago
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Wanna know about brazilian authorities? Check this if you want general info about how it works and this if you wanna contact any cybercrimes specialized goverment police. If you want to know the USA, you should visit the links on this comment. Don't ask me to find Chinese, Russian and other countries blahblahblah stuff to satisfy you. Search for them yourself.

6 days ago
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You check this and tell us how incompetent or corrupt cops that can only solve 10% of murders are suddenly huge experts in foreign cyber crime with profits in the $2 league: https://www.wsj.com/articles/brazils-sky-high-murder-rate-begins-to-fall-11568122084

6 days ago
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Are we back to presumptions and suppositions? Again?

6 days ago
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No, you are, I still haven't moved anywhere from the reality everyone else here shares than you.

6 days ago
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I totally agree that you still haven't moved anywhere.

6 days ago
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But you should, step out of your idealistic cotton candy world where everything works as it should to the harsh real world where things can just not work. I mean with that idealism your cops should solve 100% of murders right? Yet for some mysterious reason the number is missing a 0. Maybe that should wake you up to finally understand that nobody will ever care about foreign theft of $2 or even $20 just because the crime will have guaranteed 0% solved due to real world restrictions.

6 days ago
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Oh come on. There are only so many resources available, no agency is going to waste their time and resources except to file the complaint and forget about it.
Here in the US, we have between 2,000 and 4,000 serial killers walking free, only 60% of murder cases get solved here.

I was an investigator who worked on fraud cases for years, I can tell you firsthand that there are simply not enough resources to solve all these crimes, let alone international cyber crimes. No agency is going to spend $10,000 to investigate a $5 crime.

6 days ago
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That's all about priority that I said here. If the agency is still spending $10.000 to investigate a $5 crime, means that the proper investigation isn't optimized enough to repress international cybercrimes. The resouces will always be limited (that's basics on economy), but your government has to repress efficiently with positive actions. If no victim report the cybercrime, even the smallest ones, no action will be taken and I'm not even talking about a criminal file (edit: or investigation) against this criminal in particular.

6 days ago*
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You have more faith in the system than most, and that is not a bad thing.

Myself, I would not waste time over a $5 loss. I would consider it a lesson learned. My time is too valuable to waste on it.

Others might report when they have $1 stolen, but other than filing the report nothing will ever come of it. No investigation will ever be made. No agency will ever direct resources to such a petty crime.

In a perfect world that would not be the case but like I said, even in the USA we can't even catch a large portion of murderers here.

¯_(ツ)_/¯

6 days ago
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Too bad... Your decision will let this happen to other victims. I don't feel bad for your decision, but I feel bad for the next victims. Your decision also antecipate what government should do with these data, which will delay even more advances on the cybercrimes matter because I presume you don't participate actively of all positive action to repress cybercrime (which is literally impossible because you can't be in the legislative executive and judiciary at the same time).

6 days ago
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I too am a lawyer, and my experience is that filing such a report is a complete waste of time. I was once the attempted victim of a check-refund fraud scam (didn't fall for it).
I provided the authorities a synopsis of the scam, multiple emails providing more that sufficient proof, the fake check, the phone number of the scammer, notes on our conversation, the bank account the scammer wanted me to send the refund to, and more, with several days' buffer (the scammer will disappear if the money isn't received quickly enough). Nothing happened with it. Absolutely nothing.

Basically, law enforcement prioritizes, and all but the largest jurisdictions simply don't have the expertise or the resources to investigate low-value fraud

6 days ago
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Yea.

I had an actual paycheck of mine stolen once out of my mailbox and cashed by someone who forged my name at a check cashing place. I never even got refunded the amount of the check, after filing a report, an interview with police, contact with my employer, the check cashing place, and the bank that wrote the check (also the post office).

Nothing. Ever. Happened. And that was over a thousand bucks. Still pisses me off when I think about it. A federal crime and no resolution for me.

To think we should waste our time over a few bucks, knowing that nothing will ever come of it is just silly.

6 days ago
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in my case, the attempt was $150,000.
The scammers target out-of-state attorneys, asking for some work with some kind of financing, lending, secured transaction, whatever. The fake company is in another state. The other party is a legit company nearby that you can research (but knows nothing of this). You agree to a fee, say $8,000. Then they send you a check for $158,000, which is your fee and the amount of the loan. As an attorney, you deposit it in your trust account. Two or three days later your bank lets you know the funds are available. Then the deal falls apart, and the scammer asks you to wire them the money back. Well, you have the funds, so you wire the money back as requested.

The way it works is, your bank must make the funds available within 3 days, but it can take two weeks before they find out the check is fake. But when you wire funds, those are sent immediately. So by the time the bank finds out the check is fake, your money is gone. The bank then removes the money out of your bank account, as the check never cleared - you're out $150k. Oh, and the scammer clears out the bank account immediately.

Attorneys are a great target, because they often deal with transactions in those numbers, confidentiality rules prohibit lawyers from discussing these things, and lawyers have trust accounts for handling client's money - which must be promptly refunded. So if you don't send the funds back immediately, they start threatening a bar complaint.

6 days ago
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How can you still be using checks to move money is so amusing. Meanwhile whole of EU is getting instant bank transfers on top of SEPA transfers only taking a day or so to move money to another country now. Bit harder to forge a digital signature and you don't need to keep access to a piece of paper worth hundreds of thousands that anything can happen to.

6 days ago
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In the U.S., banking is about 25-30 years behind Europe.
Until about 10 years ago, some banks still used pin numbers to access online accounts. Until recently, automatic payments meant the bank would automatically print and mail out a check on your behalf.
Chip & Pin still hasn't been adopted as a standard.

It's ridiculous how far behind the U.S. is

5 days ago
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5 days ago
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I remember going nuts when I'd deal wtih companies who insisted that certain documents/information could only be sent by fax because "it's more secure" than email. meanwhile, not a day went by that we'd receive errant faxes that had nothing to do with us

5 days ago
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A friend had fun times 10-15y ago trying to find a fax machine anywhere when some stupid French online store would only accept his warranty return of some broken item after he faxed them the receipt. I mean it's not like the online store would have digital receipts of who ordered what or anything. I think he finally gave up because the item was worth less than the time and trouble needed to return it.

5 days ago
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In Brazil, if a crime didn't happen beacuse offender didn't effectively had success on their try and the crime doesn't accept the "attemped mode", their actions don't have any value to any authority (except those who are commissioned to prevent crimes). Some crimes here aren't punisheable when in the "preparation phase" beacuse the "plan" are simple actions that doesn't lead, necessarily, to the future action (well known internationally as presumption of innocence)... If you report something like that here, your case won't even be on the crime data gathering. This way, nothing happen is something you should expect. Most countries I know their legal system works like that.
But, somehow, if your country punish such acts before the concretization of the offense in this specific case, the authorities should do whatever they need to do with your case, considering their priorities, resouces, etc etc, but do nothing is a crime (edit: for authorities) in most countries I know. Report situations like these may not help you in a specific case, but will help a whole system to work and improve, thing that doesn't happen alone.

6 days ago*
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In most european countries, America, Canada, Australia, and South Africa it doesn't matter if a crime succeeds or not, for most crimes, planning, attempting, and succeeding all have the same level of punishment.

However, how serious law enforcement takes it does differ - obviously a crime that has already been committed is of a higher priority than one that hasn't even been attempted yet.

6 days ago
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I just looked it up. In Brazil, planning and preparing for a crime is not punishable, but attempting a crime is punishable. This requires actual action.

Just to clarify. If three people agree to kidnap a person, and buy all the materials required, in the U.S. that is a crime, but in Brazil it is not.

If the three people go to the person's house, ring the doorbell, and try to get their victim to come out of the house so they can grab him and run, but the person resists and shuts the door on them, in Brazil that is a crime, as the people have taken concrete action in the commission of a crime, even though they haven't succeeded. However, the penalty is less than if they would have succeeded.

6 days ago
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Well in the US conspiracy also requires an act towards the commission. Depending on the area, but still most case law will uphold planning + something like 'casing' a place as an act to further commission a crime.
I was a paralegal for a short stint as well so I know all about the problems with trusts and what not. I worked for a lawyer who was a scumbag and might finally be getting out of prison about now though. No offense to lawyers, but this guy was special. xD

I am curious though- if say an attorney got scammed that 150k and it drained their trust account etc. Would something like that fall on malpractice insurance? Or would it basically just destroy the LLC/Corp/etc? Because this is scary and I am sure that people have gotten scammed by it before.

6 days ago
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In the U.S. it varies from State to State, but most states do require some overt act, not just idle chatter, however, some statutes do not require an over act (see U.S. v. Shabani, 513 US 10, 1994)

As to the end result, malpractice insurance covers malpractice, it doesn't cover falling victim to fraud. neither does CGL. The attorney/LLC/Corp would need to cover it out of pocket or go bankrupt. Even worse, because the funds came out of the Trust Account, it took money away from other clients, which will need to be repaid - if the LLC/Corp got shut down, the attorney/attorneys would still be personally liable, and if they can't pay up, face disciplinary hearings (and probably lose their license - the one thing you can't do as an attorney is fuck with a client's money; it's the number one cause of disbarment)

5 days ago
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we´re not talking about mass scammers and blackmailing, as if some kind of indian microsoft scam.
If instead of ordering a chargeback, i go to my local police over a 10€ loss, they will laugh me out of the building

6 days ago
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Or since they are polite and follow the law, they will tell you that nothing will ever happen so don't waste everyone's time and only laugh at you after you leave.

6 days ago
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they can* (edited the verb) laugh but they have to do their job, because that's what you paid them for thru taxes. the decision to minimize or even irrelevate your loss is only yours. they can't/won't decide this for you. the authorities has the legal duty to take actions against crimes. by crimes I mean any crimes. also, they have to register, track, catalog and make data for these, because they will never know if something is "mass" until a "mass" come to report the same crime. the decision to minimize or irrelevate internet crimes is what contribute to scammers to think these dematerialized places are no man's land.

6 days ago*
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I ask once again, has this ever happened during your career? You could just tell us how many $2s have the Brazilian authorities recovered from Russia or China? You're making it sound like the number must be really high since this is every day work for you.

6 days ago
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Even better, I'll let you think that Africa is responsible to do anything against a Nigerian, because, somehow, this makes sense in your world.

This wasn't enough to give you a hint?

6 days ago
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Yes, it was enough to give me the hint that you're a little kid with no idea of the real world. Still no number I see? How many times, you can call the federal friends to ask if they know of one ever happening as well.

6 days ago
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I don't call anyone to know things. I make them do things because that's their job.
Otherwise, they face the legal consequences refusing to do what should be done. That's my job.

6 days ago
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Sure, still no number so it must be 0 and everything else total BS. Otherwise you could just have given the number right away.

6 days ago
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Yeah, because everything outside the cotton candy world is BS. Nice! Keep going.

6 days ago
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Protip: the real world isn't made of cotton candy like you seem to imagine. So either you are a kid or then just some rich person who imagines everything in the world must work like you say, but in either case you really should learn about the real world.

6 days ago
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pro

kek

6 days ago
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How about instead of making yourself look more foolish with every comment you could finally answer the question?

Let's make it really easy, can you find me any case at any time of history when Brazilian authorities have recovered a stolen $2 from Russia or China? Your refusal to answer this questions tells us that the real answer is 0 and you fully well know this. Just 1 actual case ever happening would prove me wrong instantly, why can't you do that with all your supposed power and contacts?

6 days ago
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Brazilian authorities have recovered a stolen $2 from Russia or China?

That's not how any criminal system works, even when local criminal vs. local victim.
Adjust your question to the real world and you'll get your answer.

6 days ago
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How about you adjust your answer to 0 like everyone already knows it will be.

But since you're for some mysterious reason trying to prolong this by playing ignorant, let's change the question.

How many Russian scammers who stole $2 with some dupe key on a Chinese scammer platform have gone to jail in any country ever? How many of these have the Brazilian authorities actually wasted any time investigating?

6 days ago
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Am I suppose to give you data that is made by Chinese government? Am I suppose to find you cases that fit in your criteria to satisfy you? Why don't you read yourself your own government data and find this data yourself fitted to your own country's reality? If you are very lazy (which I really think you are at this point), you can find such info from USA government sites which google always gives you the first results here and here. I also must say that victims actions on USA are very similar to Brazil, which is also very similar to G2A statement for using their program.

6 days ago
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It was supposed to be the Brazilian local authorities that have the supreme power to investigate any crime happening in any country according to you, but now it's suddenly not working.

So total BS, thanks for confirming. And if you bother to read the rest of this thread, nobody else lives in the same fantasy world as you.

And some more reality for you about your precious Brazilian authorities and how effective they are: https://www.wsj.com/articles/brazils-sky-high-murder-rate-begins-to-fall-11568122084

Researchers, however, note that it is hard to determine in Brazil why murders are rising or falling. Only one in 10 are solved. That makes it hard to pinpoint motives and, therefore, the reasons why killings rise or fall.

6 days ago*
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Even better, I'll let you think that Africa is responsible to do anything against a Nigerian, because, somehow, this makes sense in your world.

This wasn't enough to give you a hint?

6 days ago
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It was still enough to give us all a hint that you're a kid pretending to be someone important to show off. It hasn't worked yet and it wont work ever, so why not just move on instead of still imagining someone believes you?

6 days ago
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I didn't connect to SteamGifts to satisfy you. :D

6 days ago
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Well you managed to do it anyways, thanks for the entertainment. :)

6 days ago
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I think what you represent is the idealized version of how the system works. I'm sure they have to take your statement and fill out the paper work, but they don't actively have to do anything about it. The police station has limited resources (time, personnel and money) which doesn't allow them to realistically pursue every single crime that's reported. So they have to prioritize and it's doubtful this would make it very high on the list.

6 days ago
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And on top of that, there is absolutely nothing they could do even if they wanted about petty crime happening overseas. Literally nothing at all. They can send the Chinese authorities a request to sell out their scammers to some other country and that would get used as toilet paper at most.

6 days ago
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I honestly do not know enough about law, and certainly not enough about international law to comment on that. I would assume you'd need to have some sort of co-operation between the two countries, where the country involving the perpetrator would take over any legal action towards them. It would seem rather silly to ask for extradition for petty crimes in my opinion. It would highly depend on which two countries would have to co-operate I think. But this is mostly conjecture on my part, I wouldn't actually know to be honest.

6 days ago
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You got it exactly right. Now we're getting to the point of why these scammers almost always are in China, Russia or any of the other rogue nations completely ignoring international laws and treaties to protect their own citizens. Maybe even give them a medal for scamming some filthy American capitalist pig.

6 days ago
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You're right. Some crimes have more priority than others, but I'm against the victim move on and do nothing. This atitude have a very severe long-term consequence that I said here in the end... The impunity is the mother of recidivism. If all victims decide to do nothing, nothing will ever be done. If previous victims decided to do nothing, there wasn't any advances on laws, creation of tools to investigate such cases, even international agreements. They all exists just because previous victims decided to do something with their low priority case. You may not punish your scammer in particular (in this case you can at least refund using program), but you'll contribute to make a system work.

6 days ago
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Yes, you have a point of course, if many people complain, it may actually draw attention to a problem. I also agree that not doing anything doesn't help, like you said nothing will change, but I also believe you have to pick your battles. It wouldn't be worth my time and effort in reporting something as small as this either.

6 days ago
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and it wouldn't get taken seriously anyway.

As has been mentioned before, law enforcement has to prioritize, and this just isn't a priority.

6 days ago
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Even if it was priority #1, they still couldn't do anything at all because both the platform where it happened and the culprit are in hostile countries wanting to have nothing at all to do with your law enforcement. This is the simple fact why they don't give it priority because solving the crime would be impossible at best.

6 days ago
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The U.S. does not have any treaty with any country to enforce judgments, partly because the rest of the world thinks U.S. judgments are often excessive. However, that doesn't mean it won't/can't be enforced, just that whoever wins a judgment in the U.S. needs to ask a local court to enforce the judgment, which they may or may not do.

As for crimes committed abroad, U.S. law enforcement would need to provide sufficient information, and ask the local government to prosecute. It is then up to the local authorities to decide whether to proceed.
Partly, the decision is based on workload (a complete pack is more likely to be prosecuted than a partial file - i.e. how much work would they need to do), and severity (how heinous the crime, whether it only affects foreigners or could also affect locals, etc.)
But it's also partly a political decision - if the country is trying to curry favor with the U.S., they might start prosecuting, but if they're in hardball negotiations, they won't do anything.
And note that all of the above applies for all countries, and part of the decision to prosecute also has to do with culture - some countries place an emphasis on international cooperation, other countries place an emphasis on protecting their own.

5 days ago
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I agree. We are made to believe that these crimes won't be investigated, because in fact they won't be. The police/government doesn't care. They should be investigated. If you sum up 2 bucks from every single person they scam it adds up to a lot of money. But only honest people feel outraged by this lack of.
Sadly, I for one, also live in Brazil, a country where most people try to take advantage even in the small things and don't respect the law. I have no faith in our judicial system. We don't even solve 10% of our homicides here. The police is corrupt and doesn't give a damn. If you call in need of help you will wait for 2 hours if they ever come. But if you pass in front of the police station during that time you will see them talking and lazing around.This just gives the population another motive to take advantage of others. They know absolutely nothing will happen to them.
That's what makes some people so cynical that they feel it's absurd to report such a crime. [And I know for a fact that some cops wouldn't even file that report]
That is, of course, our fault too. If we don't fight the system we can't change it. Just because it won't be investigated it doesn't mean that's right and that we shouldn't report it. If fact, we should do so regardless of the outcome. We should start fighting for our rights and expect that authorities will do their jobs in hope that that will eventually become true.

3 days ago
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Yep you are right, OP just needs to make a police report and send it to g2a. he will get his money back forsure. if you live in a big city you can make police report online, or on the phone. no need to go into station. then u just send g2a the report # so they verify and u get ur cash back.

3 days ago
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And now you know why G2A is cheaper than reputable sites.

6 days ago
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Gotta say the site did go down in the drains definitely when 2019 started. Before the money back system did actually work and sellers were responsive in such cases. Twice got dupe and funny thing that both were gifts for friends. After what changes came to be during this year the site seems to be even worse and worse, well not saying it didn't have quite many issues because of them already, but seems like scammers are starting to collect around the site more after those changes. Did check forums and seemed like there was spike with issues like these back then.

At least here police won't go after over border cases which are less that 800€ or so and probably not even when amount is passing that. Individuals usually have shitty standpoint in these and companies get more attention. Also there might not be many resources to spent upon such trivial cases in the end, certainly not towards few euros especially if they won't even go after hundreds. Getting issue forward some company that deals stuff like this otherhand can take things further if several cases come in to their attention.

Certainly not worth it to waste time over stuff they recommend you to do. Most likely might just cause even more money loss in the end.

6 days ago
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Just file a dispute with your payment provider, take it as a learning experience, and move on.

Aside:

Are they serious? This is just a "fuc* you" answer

What was even the point of editing out the letter K? Lmao.

6 days ago
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Wow, that is ridiculous... Thanks for letting us learn from your experience. Hopefully you can make a claim against them with your bank/paypal and get your money back.

Here police can't even solve 70% of murders, they definitely are not going to waste their time about virtual goods purchased from a foreign website. :P

I used G2A to buy a few games years ago before I knew what it really was. Also bought their first bundle when they were experimenting with that a couple years ago, since they keys were supposedly sourced directly from the publishers. Also used G2APay in the past on some other semi-shady sites like HRK. But I deleted my G2A account(s) when they announced the "We will charge you a fee if you don't use our service every XX days"...

6 days ago
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its not about police solving this. g2a just wants to see you made a police report. once they verify you actually made it then u will get your money back.

3 days ago
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Police , wtf ? they scammed me a while ago but this.. are they really that out of control ? Guys don't ever buy anything from G2A , even if it's dirt cheap .

6 days ago
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I understand many want to buy games cheaper because some regions have very overpriced game prices. For example: East Europe, and I am pretty sure there are more regions out there, I have just experiences about that one.

But buying from a scammer site is bad. If it was a bundled game then the possibilities about an ok key are high. But it is just as bad to buy unbundled through steam trades or barter if that is a curator connect offer because that is some kind of scam too.

I am happy that I like quite many genres so I have a huge backlog and i don't feel the rush to play new games right on the release. After all, nowadays many AAA games get even more than -50% after just 2-3months or less.

6 days ago
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No idea why they never gave any problems with my ticket about a dupe key, and no i don't use shields.
Kinguin went fine for the first few months then i got several dupes, don't use shields either but they always were helpful too.

6 days ago
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About 50% of keys I ever bought on Kinguin were bad... but I got a refund in every case without any problems (just send screenshots), and I never paid for the protection there, either. I only bought from sellers with huge feedback counts and I understand the refund comes from the seller and kinguin support is only facilitating that communication. So thanks to those sellers for being professional about it.

6 days ago
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That's still a lot of bad ones. unless you bought 4 keys together. :p

Only thing though you get your money back but never the fee costs and you have to pay that again if you want to try to get the same game from another seller.

6 days ago
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That is out of about 20 keys I purchased there in my life. "Bad key" in my case is meaning one of: dupe/invalid key, working-but-wrong key, or a region-locked key when it was supposed to be ROW.

6 days ago
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Report to police is nice thing...
I had similar situation with orligifts site - when I reported dupe key they asked me to request from Valve info who did activate that key and when xD

6 days ago
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That is actually a reasonable thing to ask.

6 days ago
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I doubt Valve would provide the info who activated it.

6 days ago
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That they will not do. But if asked they will provide the time when the key was activated. So orlygift asked to see if the key is really a dupe or someone wanting to get an extra key.

6 days ago
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Ok. Try to ask when H5C44-49YLR-FGY6J was activated for example. And post that "f off" answer here =P

6 days ago
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I did open a ticket with valve asking WHEN the key was activated. No answer yet.

5 days ago
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They were more than happy to oblige. You just gotta ask the right way!

View attached image.
5 days ago
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Oh wow...
I tried to find their old reply but my HelpRequests tab is empty pretending I had no a single ticket created ever.
But I do remember it was like "don't buy games from scam resellers, buy games from steam"

5 days ago
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For fun purpose -I just found on my PC old file with ~800 game keys for trade. Should I create ticket for every one? xD

6 days ago
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Dont buy in grey markets.

6 days ago
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For some reason I was always sure that they will never return money. It's good to know I was right.

6 days ago
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Make a forgery. Shady method vs shady 'company'.

Anyway, your loss for not hearing the warnings.

6 days ago
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No, don't do this. Making a fake police report could get you into serious trouble.

6 days ago
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Oh, it's like my dealings with a certain budget airline on flights from Ireland to UK to visit family. When I was called in for my surgery at short notice, I applied via their website's illness form for part refund. I got a very smarmy email stating that they never do refunds under any circumstances and in so many words were telling me to "fuck off." (eh, hello... form on site, and I provided all the proof) The cost of rescheduling would have been more than the flights themselves. I won't be using them in future. lol.

Grey market sites, budget airlines and all of those are all the same. You kinda know you're taking a risk when you buy from them.

6 days ago*
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G2A's "Money Back Guarantee" is a complete SCAM

There. Corrected.
As they say, if a deal sounds too good to be true, then it's definitely a scam, in one way or another.

6 days ago
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